Programmes from past Cork International Short Story Festivals

 

Cork International Short Story Festival 2017

 

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Programme of Events 2017

 

 

WEDNESDAY

Southword Journal showcase
A reading with Gerry Boland & Lane Ashfeldt, moderated by Patrick Cotter.

Gerry BolandLane Ashfeldt

13th September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Southword Journal is a literary publication produced by the Munster Literature Centre three times each year. Two writers who have previously contributed to Southword will feature in this event: Gerry Boland and Lane Ashfeldt.

Gerry Boland is a poet and author. He was born and lived for much of his life in Dublin and moved to north Roscommon in 1999. His first collection of poems, Watching Clouds, was published by Doghouse Books in 2011, and his second, In the Space Between (Arlen House) appeared in 2016. In 2011 and 2012, O’Brien Press published his trilogy, A Rather Remarkable Grizzly Bear, the first of which, Marco Moves In, was nominated for an Irish Book Award. His first collection of short stories, The Far Side of Happiness is due out in 2017 by Arlen House.

Lane Ashfeldt is the author of the fiction collection  SaltWater, a book of twelve short stories and a novella. She contributed a section on writing historical fiction to Short Circuit: A Guide to the Art of the Short Story. Her historical short story ‘Dancing on Canvey’ won the Fish Short Histories Prize. Other of her stories have appeared in anthologies and literary journals, among them Punk Fiction (Portico), Dancing With Mr Darcy (Honno), Rarebit (Parthian), Southword, The Guardian, The London Magazine, The Lonely Crowd, and the Dublin Review. 

 

 

 

From The Well Short Story Competition reading
A reading with the winning and commended writers. Event moderated by Billy O'Callaghan.

From the Well Anthology

13th September at 4pm
Cork Central Library
Admission: FREE


Each year the Cork County Library and Arts Service From the Well Short Story competition is open to writers over the age of eighteen who are members of any library. Twenty stories were shortlisted by Billy O’Callaghan and a panel of judges including Claire Kilroy and Eimear Ryan for publication in the From the Well anthology (April 2016). Three of the contributors to the anthology are to read at this event: Tadhg Coakley, Mary Rose McCarthy, and winner Anne O'Leary.

 

 

 

Danielle McLaughlin & Madeleine D'Arcy
A reading by two Cork writers, moderated by Eimear Ryan.

Danielle McLaughlinMadeleine D'Arcy

13th September at 7.30pm
The Goldie Chapel, Nano Nagel Place
Admission: €5

 

Danielle McLaughlin's stories have appeared in newspapers and magazines such as The Stinging Fly, The Irish Times, and The New Yorker. Her awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition 2012, The From the Well short story competition 2012, The Willesden Short Story Prize 2013, The Merriman Short Story Competition 2013 in memory of Maeve Binchy, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition 2013. Her debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs on Other Planets was published in Ireland by The Stinging Fly Press in 2015. Together with Madeleine D'Arcy, she co-runs Fiction at the Friary, a new monthly fiction event in Cork.
 

Madeleine D'Arcy’s début short story collection, Waiting For The Bullet (Doire Press, 2014), won the Edge Hill Readers’ Choice Prize 2015 (UK). In 2010 she received a Hennessy Literary Award for First Fiction and the overall Hennessy Literary Award for New Irish Writers. She holds an MA in Creative Writing (First Class Honours) from University College, Cork. Madeleine co-runs Fiction at the Friary, a monthly fiction event in Cork City, with fellow-writer Danielle McLaughlin.

 

 

 

Fiction at the Friary presents Rapid-Fire Reading & Story-Songs
A fast-paced event featuring twenty local writers.

Fiction at the Friary

13th September at 9pm
Goldie Chapel, Nano Nagle Place
Admission: €5

 

 

At Fiction at the Friary we like reading, writing and fun. We also like jellybeans. Join us at the Cork International Short Story Festival for a very special evening. Our Rapid-Fire Reading involves TWENTY writers (Susan Lanigan, Danny Denton, E.R. Murray, Eimear Ryan and Tehmina Kazi, to name a few) who will read short extracts from their work and – together – will write an entirely new story, start to finish, before your eyes. Come listen to the readings, watch writing in action, and hear Cork actor Kevin Power read aloud the brand new story that emerges. Also featured are guest authors who have forged links between narrative and music. Conor MacManus will read a short story, ably assisted by Colm Scully.To round off the evening, our special guest, Nick Kelly, will, in his own inimitable way, celebrate the short story in song.  

Do come along for what promises to be a quirky and fun-filled song and story event!

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THURSDAY

 

Quarryman showcase
A reading by selected Quarryman contributors, moderated by Patrick Cotter

The Quarryman

14th September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

 

Quarryman was the student-run literary journal of UCC throughout the 20th century and was recently relaunched by UCC’s inaugural MA in Creative Writing class. The UCC English Literature Society hope to continue the journal’s legacy. Contributors who will be reading at this event include Cónal Creedon, Donal Hayes, Catherine Kirwan, and Mary Morrissy.

 

 

 

Long Story, Short Journal showcase
A reading by contributors Fiona Whyte & Noel O'Regan, moderated by Editor in Chief Jennifer Matthews

Fiona WhyteNoel O'Regan

14th September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

 

Long Story, Short Journal features longer short stories of 4000 words or more. New stories are published monthly, and free to read online.

Fiona Whyte is a writer living in Crosshaven, Co. Cork. Her short stories have been published in Crannóg Magazine, Quarryman, The Hollybough and Long Story, Short and have been shortlisted for the Fish Publishing Short Story Competition, the Listowel Originals competition and the Cork City Library K Award. She has won the Tipperary Premier Short Story Competition. In 2016 she was awarded a Government of Ireland Postgraduate scholarship to pursue a PhD in creative writing at University College Cork. She is currently writing a historical novel based on the life of St Cuthbert.

Noel O'Regan is the recipient of a number of prizes, including the Sean Dunne Young Writer Award and Leonard A. Koval Memorial Prize. His stories have appeared in publications such as Ambit, The Stinging Fly and The Penny Dreadful. A former Kerry County Council Writer in Residence, he has also had work listed for the Writing.ie Irish Short Story of the Year.

 

 

 

Deborah Willis & June Caldwell
Readings by Canadian and Irish writers, moderated by Jennifer Matthews.

Deborah WillisJune Caldwell
14th September at 7pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon
Admission: €5

 


Deborah Willis
was born and raised in Calgary, Alberta. Her first book, Vanishing and Other Stories, was named one of the the Globe and Mail's Best Books of 2009, and was nominated for the Governor General's Award. Her fiction has appeared in The Walrus, The Virginia Quarterly, The Iowa Review, Lucky Peach, and Zoetrope. Her second collection of short stories, The Dark and Other Love Stories, was published with Hamish Hamilton, the literary imprint of Penguin Random House Canada, and with W.W. Norton and Company in the U.S. in February 2017. Deborah is currently working on a novel.

 

June Caldwell worked for many years as a journalist and now writes fiction. Her story ‘SOMAT’ was published in the award-winning anthology The Long Gaze Back, edited by Sinéad Gleeson and was chosen as a ‘favourite’ by The Sunday Times. She is a prizewinner of the Moth International Short Story Prize and has been shortlisted for many others including the Calvino Prize in Fabulist Fiction, the Colm Toíbín International Short Story Award, the Lorian Hemingway Prize, and the Sunday Business Post/ Penguin Ireland Short Story Prize. She has an MA in Creative Writing from Queen’s University Belfast, and lives in Dublin.

 

 

 

Alannah Hopkin & Carlo Gébler
Readings by two Irish writers, moderated by Paul McVeigh.

Alannah HopkinCarlo Gebler

14th September at 8.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5

 

Alannah Hopkin is a novelist, travel writer and critic from Kinsale, Co Cork. She has published two novels (Hamish Hamilton, London); other books include West Cork, the People & the Place (The Collins Press, Cork). Her stories have appeared in the London Magazine and The Cork Literary Review. The Dogs of Inishere (Dalkey Archive Press) is her first story collection.

Carlo Gébler was born Dublin in 1954, the eldest son of writer parents, Ernest Gébler and Edna O’Brien. His recent publications from New Island are The Projectionist: The Story of Ernest Gébler, The Wing Orderly's Tales, and The Innocent of Falkland Road. He teaches at Trinity and is a member of Aosdána.

 

 

 

Kanishk Tharoor & Marie-Helene Bertino
Readings by two international writers, moderated by Thomas Morris.

Kanishk TharoorMarie Helene Bertino

14th September at 10pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5

 

Kanishk Tharoor is a writer based in New York City. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, the Guardian, VQR, and elsewhere. His short story ‘Tale of the Teahouse’ was nominated for a National Magazine Award. He presented Museum of Lost Objects, a ten-part BBC radio series on cultural destruction in the Middle East. He studied at Yale, Columbia, and New York University, where he was a ‘Writer in Public Schools’ fellow.

Marie-Helene Bertino’s debut novel 2 A.M. AT THE CAT'S PAJAMAS was a Best Book of 2014 from NPR, Buzzfeed, and many others. Her collection of short stories SAFE AS HOUSES was the recipient of The Iowa Short Fiction Award (judged by Jim Shepard) and long-listed for the Frank O’Connor International Story Prize. Awards include the O. Henry Prize, a Pushcart Prize, Mississippi Review's Story Prize, and several fellowships. Her fiction has appeared in Granta, Guernica, and many others. She teaches at NYU and is a faculty member of the low-residency MFA program at Institute for American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM.

 

 

 

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FRIDAY

 

Banshee & The Tangerine: literary journal showcase
Readings by contributors Laura McKenna, Niamh Campbell, Louise Kennedy & Darrah McCausland. Event moderated by Eimear Ryan.

Banshee JournalThe Tangerine15th September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)

Admission: FREE

 

 

Join us for readings from two of the island’s newest and most dynamic literary journals: Banshee and The Tangerine. Contributors who will read at the event include Laura McKenna, Niamh Campbell, Louise Kennedy, and Darragh McCausland.

Banshee publishes exciting, contemporary and accessible new writing from Ireland and around the world. Now in its fifth issue, it features short stories, flash fiction, poetry and personal essays.

The Tangerine is a Belfast-based magazine of new writing. Founded in 2016, it includes features, reportage, commentary, fiction, poetry, illustration and photography.

 

 

 

The Seán Ó Faoláin Prizegiving
With a reading by the 2017 winner and prize presentation by judge Paul McVeigh.

Louise Nealon

15th September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Louise Nealon is a twenty-six year old writer from Co. Kildare. She studied English literature in Trinity College Dublin, and then completed a Masters in Creative Writing at Queen’s University Belfast in 2016. She currently lives on her family’s farm where she divides her time between reading, writing and milking cows. She will be reading her prizewinning story, 'What Feminism Is', at this event.

The Sean O’Faolain Prize is awarded to the best single story entered in competition from anywhere in the world. The first prize is €2000. The winner also receives a week’s residency at the Anam Cara artist retreat in West Cork and publication of their winning story in Southword. The winner, if they choose to travel to Cork for this event, also receives accommodation with meals for the duration of the festival and entry into all events. This occasion is an opportunity to hear the winning story and the judge’s citation from Paul McVeigh. The competition is now closed, and the winning and shortlisted stories have been announced on our competitions page.

 

 

 

Tania Hershman & Nuala O'Connor
Readings by British and Irish authors, moderated by Jennifer Matthews

Tania HershmanNuala O Connor

15th September at 7pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon
Admission: €5


Tania Hershman third short story collection, Some Of Us Glow More Than Others, was published by Unthank Books in May 2017, and her debut poetry collection, Terms & Conditions, by Nine Arches Press in July. Tania is co-author of Writing Short Stories: A Writers' & Artists' Companion and curator of ShortStops, celebrating short stories across the UK & Ireland.

Nuala O’Connor AKA Nuala Ní Chonchúir was born in Dublin, Ireland, she lives in East Galway. Her fifth short story collection Joyride to Jupiter was published by New Island in June 2017. Penguin USA, Penguin Canada and Sandstone (UK) published Nuala’s third novel, Miss Emily, about the poet Emily Dickinson and her Irish maid. Miss Emily was shortlisted for the Bord Gáis Energy Eason Book Club Novel of the Year 2015 and longlisted for the 2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award. Nuala’s fourth novel, Becoming Belle, will be published in 2018. 

 

 

 

Alan McMonagle & Billy O'Callaghan
Readings by two Irish writers, moderated by Paul McVeigh.

Alan McMonagleBilly O'Callaghan
15th September at 8.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5

 

Alan McMonagle has written for radio and published two collections of short stories, Liar Liar (Wordsonthestreet, 2008) and Psychotic Episodes (Arlen House, 2013), both of which were nominated for the Frank O'Connor Award. In November 2015, he signed a two-book deal with Picador, and in March 2017, Ithaca, his debut novel was published and immediately nominated for the Desmond Elliott Award for first novels. He lives in Galway.

Billy O'Callaghan, from Cork, is the author of three short story collections: In Exile (2008) and In Too Deep (2009), both published by Mercier Press, and The Things We Lose, the Things We Leave Behind (2013), published by New Island Books, which won the 2013 Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Award for Short Story of the Year, and which has been selected as Cork's 'One City, One Book' for 2017. His first novel, The Dead House, was published by O'Brien Press/Brandon Books in May 2017. A novella, A Death in the Family, will be published in late 2017 as a Ploughshares Solo.

 

 

 

April Ayers Lawson & Callan Wink
Readings by two American writers published by Granta. Event moderated by Danny Denton.

April Ayers LawsonCallan Wink

15th September at 10pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5

 

 

April Ayers Lawson is the recipient of the 2011 George Plimpton Award for Fiction, as well as a 2015 writing fellowship from the Corporation of Yaddo. ‘Virgin’ was also named a 2011 favourite short story of the year by Flavorwire magazine and anthologized in The Unprofessionals: New American Writing from the Paris Review (Penguin 2016). Her fiction has appeared in the Norwegian version of Granta, Oxford American, Vice, ZYZZYVA, Crazyhorse, and Five Chapters, among others. She has lectured in the Creative Writing Department at Emory University. Virgin and Other Stories is her first book.

Callan Wink was born in Michigan in 1984 and works as a fishing guide on the Gallatin River in Montana. His work has been published in The New Yorker, Granta, and The Best American Short Stories. Dog Run Moon is his first book.

 

 

 

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SATURDAY

 

Tanya Farrelly & Sean O'Reilly
Readings by two Irish writers, event moderated by Rob Doyle.
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Tanya FarrellySean O'Reilly

16th September at 3pm
Firkin Crane Theatre (Shandon)
Admission: €5

 


Tanya Farrelly
works as an EFL teacher and facilitates Creative Writing classes for South Dublin County Council. Her stories have won prizes and been shortlisted in such competitions as the Hennessy Awards, the RTE Francis MacManus Award, and the Fish International Short Story Competition. She has also read her work on RTE’s Sunday Miscellany. In 2013, Tanya completed a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at Bangor University, Wales. Her debut story collection, When Black Dogs Sing, was published by Arlen House in 2016. The Girl Behind the Lens is her first full-length novel.

Sean O’Reilly, born in Derry in 1969, is the author of Curfew and Other Stories, Love and Sleep, The Swing of Things and Watermark. He lives in Ireland.

 

 

The Short Story: State of the Art
A public discussion with selected festival contributors.

Flash Fiction

16th September at 4.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon
Admission: €5

 

'State of the Art': A public discussion with Thomas Morris, Rob Doyle, Danielle McLaughlin and Nuala O'Connor, moderated by Tania Hershman, on the state of the contemporary short story.

 

 

Giovanni Frazzetto
Reading moderated by Patrick Cotter

Giovanni Frazetto

16th September at 7pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5

 

 

Giovanni Frazzetto was born and grew up in the southeast of Sicily. He studied science at University College London and received a Ph.D. from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany. In 2008, for his cross-disciplinary and science communication efforts he was awarded the John Kendrew Young Scientist Award. Giovanni Frazetto is the author of Together, Closer: Stories of Intimacy in Friendship, Love, and Family from Little, Brown. He now lives in Dún Laoghaire, Ireland.

 

 

 

Claire Keegan & Camilla Grudova
Readings by Irish and Canadian writers, moderated by Sinead Gleeson.

Claire KeeganCamilla Grudova

16th September at 8.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5

 

Claire Keegan grew up on a farm in Wicklow. She has published three volumes of fiction include two short story collections, Antarctica and Walk the Blue Fields, and the novella-length short story Foster. Among the accolades she has received are the Rooney Prize for Literature, The Edge Hill Prize for Short Stories and the Davy Byrnes Memorial Prize.

Camilla Grudova lives in Toronto. She holds a degree in Art History and German from McGill University, Montreal. Her fiction has appeared in The White Review and Granta. The Doll's Alphabet, from Fitzcarraldo Editions, is her first collection of short stories.

 

 

 

David Means
A reading of short stories by an American writer, moderated by Sinead Gleeson.

David Means

16th September at 10pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5

 

David Means is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker and Harper's magazine. His stories have been anthologised in publications such as Best American Short Stories and Best American Mystery Stories. Assorted Fire Events won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for fiction and a National Book Critics Circle nomination. The Secret Goldfish was shortlisted for the Frank O’Connnor International Short Story Prize. The Spot won the O. Henry prize. His first novel, Hystopia, was long listed for the 2016 Man Booker Prize. His fifth collection of stories, Instructions for a Funeral, is forthcoming from Faber & Faber.

 

 

 

Cork International Short Story Festival 2016

 

 

Programme of Events 2016

WEDNESDAY

Readings by Tina Pisco & Oisín Fagan

Tina PiscoOisin Fagan

7th September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

 

Tina Pisco has published two best-selling novels: Only a Paper Moon (Poolbeg 1998), and Catch the Magpie (Poolbeg 1999). Sunrise Sunset and other fictions (Fish 2016) is a collection of flash, short stories, a comic and a novella, which was launched by Mary Morrissy at this year’s West Cork Literary Festival.

Oisín Fagan has had fiction published in The Stinging Fly, New Planet Cabaret and the anthology Young Irelanders and his novella Heirophants was winner of the inaugural Penny Dreadful Novella Prize. His collection of stories, Hostages, is out in Autumn 2016, with New Island Press. He currently lives and works in Dublin.

 

 

Long Story, Short Journal showcase
A reading with Mary Morrissy and Mark Tuthill.

Mary MorrissyMark TuthillLong Story, Short Journal

7th September at 4pm
Cork Central Library
Admission: FREE


A reading by two contributors to the Long Story, Short Journal, an online publication edited by Jennifer Matthews, dedicated to short stories 4000 words or longer.

Mary Morrissy is the author of three novels and two collections of stories, most recently Prosperity Drive (2016). Her short fiction has been anthologised widely and won her a Hennessy Award in 1984. In 1995 she was awarded the prestigious US Lannan Award which honours writers whose work “is of exceptional quality”.

 

Mark Tuthill’s short fiction has been published in literary journals and was shortlisted for the Cross Pens Short Story Competition (commended by writers John Boyne and Danielle McLaughlin). He has just completed his first novel, The Geography of Chance. Mark has also been writing for the screen for many years.

 

 

The Women of 1916
Featuring commissioned work by Doireann Ní Ghríofa

Doireann Ní Ghríofa

7th September at 6pm
Farmgate Café, English Market, Cork
Admission: Free but ticketed. Farmgate-hosted event available to register at https://www.eventbrite.ie/ only.


Doireann Ní Ghríofa has been commissioned to compose a new short story directly inspired by the Farmgate's Women of the South exhibition. The exhibition highlights radical women associated with 1916.

Doireann Ní Ghríofa is a bilingual writer. Her third book, Clasp, was shortlisted for The Irish Times Poetry Award 2016 and was awarded the Michael Hartnett Poetry Prize. Among her other awards are the Ireland Chair of Poetry bursary 2014-2015. She writes "with tenderness and unflinching curiosity” (Poetry Magazine, Chicago).

 

 

A reading by Aidan Mathews

Aidan Mathews

7th September at 8.30pm
Church of St. Anne (Shandon)
Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

 *Please note--the listing in the front of the print brochure is incorrect, and the correct time of this event is 8.30pm.

Aidan Mathews is a poet, playwright and fiction writer. He has published a novel and three collections of stories, including Charlie Chaplin’s Wishbone and Other Stories (2014). His awards include The Irish Times Award, The Patrick Kavanagh Award, the Macauley Fellowship and an Academy of American Poets Award.

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THURSDAY

 

Banshee showcase
A reading by Aoife Casby, Dearbhaile Houston, Clara Kumagai, Catherine Talbot & Tom Vowler

Banshee

8th September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

 

Join us for readings from the autumn/winter issue of Banshee, a print journal of exciting and accessible writing from Ireland and around the world.

“A fresh, eclectic mix … there’s no ‘safe’ writing here.” – The Sunday Independent

Learn more about Aoife Casby, Dearbhaile Houston, Clara Kumagai, Catherine Talbot & Tom Vowler on the Banshee page.

 

 

Readings by Roisín O'Donnell & Joanna Walsh

Roisin O'DonnellJoanna Walsh

8th September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Roisín O'Donnell is a short story writer living in Ireland. Her work features in Young Irelanders (2015), and The Long Gaze Back (2015). She has been shortlisted for many international awards, including the Hennessy New Irish Writing Award 2016. Her debut short story collection, Wild Quiet, was published by New Island this year.

 

Joanna Walsh is a British writer and illustrator. A collection, Fractals, was published in the UK in 2013, and her memoir Hotel was published internationally in 2015. She writes literary and cultural criticism, is the fiction editor at 3:am Magazine, and created and runs the Twitter hashtag #readwomen.

 

 

Readings by Irina Kovalyova & Sarah Selecky
A showcase of Canadian writers

Irina KovalyovaSarah Selecky
8th September at 7pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon
Admission: €5
Purchase Here

 

 

Irina Kovalyova has a Master’s degree in Chemistry from Brown University, a Doctoral degree in Microbiology from Queen’s University, and a Master of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Her debut collection Specimen was published by House of Anansi Press in 2015.

 

Sarah Selecky earned her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Her writing has appeared in the top Canadian magazines and quarterlies such as The Walrus, The New Quarterly, The Journey Prize Anthology, among many others. She is the author of the book This Cake Is for the Party.

 

 

Readings by Gerard Woodward & Alan Heathcock

Gerard WoodwardAlan Heathcock

8th September at 8.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

Gerard Woodward is the author of a number of novels, including Vanishing and an acclaimed trilogy comprising August (shortlisted for the 2001 Whitbread First Novel Award), I’ll Go to Bed at Noon (shortlisted for the 2004 Man Booker Prize) and A Curious Earth. He is Professor of Creative Writing at Bath Spa University.

 

Alan Heathcock’s fiction has been published in many of America’s top journals. His stories have won the National Magazine Award in fiction, and have been selected for inclusion in The Best American Mystery Stories anthology. Volt (Graywolf Press), a collection of stories, was a Best Book 2011 selection from numerous newspapers and magazines.

 

 

Readings by Donal Ryan & Sara Majka

Donal RyanSara Majka

8th September at 10pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

Donal Ryan’s first two novels, The Spinning Heart and The Thing About December, and his short story collection A Slanting of the Sun, have all been published to major acclaim. Among his awards are the Guardian First Book Award, the EU Prize for Literature (Ireland), and Book of the Year at the Irish Book Awards.

When she was young, Sara Majka's family moved along the New England coast, living in Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, Maine, and even for a time in a lighthouse. She received graduate degrees from Umass-Amherst and Bennington College and was awarded a fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center. Cities I've Never Lived In is her first book.

 

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FRIDAY

 

Fiction Introductions:
Becca de la Rosa, Paul Lenehan & Paul Cussen

A showcase of emerging talent

Becca De La RosaPaul LenehanPaul Cussen9th September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)

Admission: FREE

 

 

A reading by exciting new voices in Irish fiction who have yet to publish a full length collection, including Becca de la Rosa, Paul Lenahan & Paul Cussen.

Becca De La Rosa writes strange stories from her home in Dublin, Ireland. She has been published in many magazines and anthologies both online and off.

Paul Lenehan, from Dublin, has been writing and publishing stories for the past twenty years, most recently in Crannóg and Tupelo Quarterly (USA). He was twice shortlisted for the Hennessy/Sunday Tribune short story award, and received an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Glamorgan.

Paul Cussen has worked as a bookseller and as a library assistant. His only work of non-fiction was Cork: A Pocket Guide (2004). His story 'The Browser' won a Waterstone’s staff prize in 2006. In 2015 his story 'Going to the Wedding' was published in the Stinging Fly.

 

 

The Seán Ó Faoláin Prizegiving
With a reading by the 2016 winner

Fiction

9th September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

 

The Sean O’Faolain Prize is awarded to the best single story entered in competition from anywhere in the world. The first prize is €2000. The winner also receives a week’s residency at the Anam Cara artist retreat in West Cork and publication of their winning story in Southword. The winner, if they choose to travel to Cork for this event, also receives accommodation with meals for the duration of the festival and entry into all events. This occasion is an opportunity to hear the winning story and the judge’s citation from Danielle McLaughlin. The competition is open for submissions through 31st July 2016.

 

 

Sinéad Gleeson & Claire-Louise Bennett

Sinead GleesonClaire-Louise Bennett

9th September at 7pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon
Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

Sinéad Gleeson is a writer, editor, freelance broadcaster and journalist. An essay, ‘Hair’, was published in Banshee, and Granta published an essay online, ‘Blue Hills and Chalk Bones’. ‘Fathoms’, a 500-word flash fiction story was highly commended at the Dromineer Literary Festival and Sinéad was also shortlisted for the 2016 Fish Memoir Prize.

Claire-Louise Bennett’s short fiction and essays have been published in The Stinging Fly, The Penny Dreadful, The Moth, Colony, The Irish Times, The White Review and gorse. She was awarded the inaugural White Review Short Story Prize. Pond (Stinging Fly Press) is her first collection of stories.

 

 

Readings by Lucy Caldwell & David Park

Lucy CaldwellDavid Park
9th September at 8.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

 

Lucy Caldwell has won multiple awards including the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature and the Dylan Thomas Prize. Her most recent novel, All the Beggars Riding, was chosen for Belfast’s One City One Book campaign in 2013 and shortlisted for the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year. Her short story collection, Multitudes, was published this year.

David Park’s books include The Light of Amsterdam and The Poets’ Wives, among others. He has won the Authors’ Club First Novel Award, the Ewart-Biggs Memorial Prize and the University of Ulster’s McCrea Literary Award, three times. His short story collection, Gods and Angels, was published this year by Bloomsbury.

 

 

Readings by Stephanie Victoire & Zsuzsi Gartner

Stephanie VictoireZsuzsi Gartner

9th September at 10pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5
Purchase Here

 

 

Stephanie Victoire was born in London to a Mauritian family. In 2014 Stephanie completed her collection of fairy and folk tales entitled The Other World, It Whispers whilst on the The Almasi League writers’ programme. Stephanie lives in London and is currently working on a novel, The Heart Note.

 

Zsuzsi Gartner is the author of the acclaimed story collections All the Anxious Girls on Earth and Better Living through Plastic Explosives (a finalist for the prestigious Scotiabank Giller Prize). She is the founder and director of Writers' Adventure Camp at the Point, and the inaugural Frank O’Connor International Short Story Fellow in Cork.

 

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SATURDAY

 

Panel Discussion: The Happiness of Getting it Down Right
(Moderated by Munster Literature Centre Director Patrick Cotter. The panel includes Nuala O'Connor, Declan Meade, Danielle McLaughlin, and Sara Majka)

Flash Fiction

10th September at 2.45pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon
Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

 

A discussion on the influence an involved editor can have on the artistic development of a writer and their work.

Nuala O'Connor is a fiction writer and poet. Writing as Nuala Ní Chonchúir she has published two novels, four collections of short fiction, a chapbook of flash fiction and three full poetry collections. Nuala's third novel, Miss Emily was short-listed for the Eason Book Club Novel of the Year. Nuala teaches occasional creative writing courses.

Declan Meade is the founding editor and publisher of The Stinging Fly magazine. In 2005 he set up The Stinging Fly Press. He has edited two anthologies of short stories for the imprint: These Are Our Lives (2006) and Let’s Be Alone Together (2008). He teaches a module on the business of publishing at the American College Dublin.

Danielle McLaughlin has won various awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition 2012, The Willesden Short Story Prize 2013, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition 2013. Her debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs on Other Planets was published in Ireland by The Stinging Fly Press.

When she was young, Sara Majka's family moved along the New England coast, living in Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, Maine, and even for a time in a lighthouse. She received graduate degrees from Umass-Amherst and Bennington College and was awarded a fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center. Cities I've Never Lived In is her first book.

 

 

Readings by John Boyne and Sean O'Brien

John BoyneSean O'Brien

10th September at 4.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre (Shandon)
Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

 

John Boyne is the author of nine novels for adults and four for younger readers, including the international bestsellers The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, A History of Loneliness and, most recently, The Boy at the Top of the Mountain. His novels are published in forty-five languages. He is married and lives in Dublin.

 

Sean O’Brien is a poet, critic, playwright, novelist and editor. He grew up in Hull and now lives in Newcastle upon Tyne. His collection of short stories, The Silence Room, appeared in 2008 and his novel, Afterlife, in 2009. Current projects include a new book of poems, a second novel and a second collection of short stories.

 

 

Readings by Polly Samson & Arlene Heyman

Polly SamsonArlene Heyman

10th September at 8pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

 

Polly Samson is the author of two highly acclaimed story collections and two novels. Her story collection, Perfect Lives, was a Sunday Times Fiction Choice of the Year and was read on BBC Radio 4. Polly Samson has been shortlisted for the VS Pritchett Memorial Prize and The Edge Hill Short Story Prize.

 

Arlene Heyman’s debut short story collection is Scary Old Sex. She has been listed twice in the honour rolls of Best American Short Stories. Heyman is a psychiatrist/psychoanalyst practising in New York City, where she lives with her husband. She is currently at work on a novel.

 

 

Reading by Neil Jordan

Neil Jordan

10th September at 9.30pm
Firkin Crane Theatre, Shandon

Admission: €5 Purchase Here

 

Neil Jordan is the author of several novels as well as Night in Tunisia, a collection of short stories which won the Guardian Fiction Prize. Mistaken, his most recent novel, was selected as Novel of the Year at the Irish Book Awards 2012. He has written a large number of award-winning films including The Crying Game and Michael Collins.

 

 

Cork International Short Story Festival 2015

 

Carys Davies

 

Programme of Events 2015

The 2015 festival readings took place at the Triskel Arts Centre and Cork Central Library. The festival featured work by writers from Ireland and abroad, including (among many others) Danielle McLaughlin, Thomas Morris, Toby Litt, Sidhartha Gigoo, Kelly Link, Segun Afolabi, Claire Keegan and Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award Winner Carys Davies. Additionally, the Long Gaze Back Anthology edited by Sinead Gleeson was launched, featuring work by Mary Costello and Eílis Ní Dhuibhne.

Afternoons events included a documentary film series about Irish writers and artists, as well as literary journal showcases of Long Story, Short Journal and Banshee. Other events included the launch of The Berries, a special volume of photography and writing inspired by the Hollyhill area of Cork City.

The Seán Ó Faoláin prize was presented by judge Danielle McLaughlin to 2015 winner Evelyn Walsh, who read her story 'White Rabbit' in the Cork Central Library.

Two workshops were held: a short story masterclass with Rachel Trezise, a poetry masterclass with Claire Keegan and Short Stories for Beginners with Danielle McLaughlin

 

N.b.: Though they appear in the programme below, both Marie Helene Bertino and Kirsty Gunn had to cancel their appearances due to unforseen circumstances. In the Kirsty Gunn event, Claire Keegan instead did an extended solo reading. Marie-Helene Bertino's craft talk was cancelled, however for her evening event Paul McVeigh stepped in to read an excerpt from his then newly published novel The Good Son.

 

Go to events on: Tuesday * Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday

 

 

 

TUESDAY

 

Book launch: The Berries
with Billy O'Callaghan and Doireann Ní Ghríofa

The Berries

22 September at 3pm
Hollyhill Library, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

 

All are welcome to the launch of The Berries, a book of stories, poems and photography inspired by the people and place of Hollyhill, commissioned by Cork City Council and the Munster Literature Centre. Contributors include Cork writers Billy O'Callaghan, William Wall, Doireann Ní Ghríofa and photographer John Minihan.

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WEDNESDAY

 

Film: Frank O'Connor Self-Portrait

Frank O'Connor

23 September at 11am
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: FREE


A film in two parts recorded especially for the first week of broadcast of Telefís Eireann in 1962. Directed by Michael Johnston. Approximately 60 minutes.

 

Readings from Long Story, Short Journal
with contributors Susan Burke-Trehy & Eimear Ryan

Susan Burke-Trehy
Eimear Ryan

23 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE


Long Story, Short Journal is edited by Jennifer Matthews, featuring longer short stories of 4000 words or more. New stories are published monthly, and free to read online.

Susan Burke-Trehy is a writer and researcher with a background in film production, journalism and third-level teaching. Awards include a bursary to participate in the 2008 International Short Story Conference and an IRCHSS PhD Scholarship. Susan is completing her first novel and is working on a short story collection. She lives in Cork with her husband and four children.

Eimear Ryan’s stories have appeared in New Irish Writing, The Stinging Fly, The Dublin Review, and the anthologies Town & Country and The Long Gaze Back. Her awards include a Hennessy First Fiction Award and an Arts Council bursary. Born in Co. Tipperary, she now lives and works in Cork.

 

Readings: Deirdre Brennan & Mary Leland
in conversation with Patrick Cotter

Deirdre Brennan
Mary Leland

23 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Deirdre Brennan was born in Dublin in 1934 and brought up in Tipperary. She writes in both Irish and English, with collections that include Scothanna Geala (Coscéim, 1989), which was a Poetry Ireland Choice of the Year; Beneath Castles Of White Sail (Divas Series, Galway, Arlen House 2003); Swimming With Pelicans / Ag Eitilt Fara Condair (Arlen House 2007); Hidden Places|Scáthán Eile (Arlen House, 2011); and most recently Staying Thin for Daddy (Arlen House, 2014). She lives in Carlow.

Mary Leland is a journalist, novelist, short story auteur, non-fiction writer. As a journalist, Leland has worked at the Cork Exaimer, Irish Times and Irish Press. As a published fiction writer, Leland’s novels include The Killeen (London, Hamish Hamilton 1985), and Approaching Priests (London, Sinclair Stevenson 1991). She also published a collection of short stories entitled The Little Galloway Girls (London, Black Swan 1987). As well as making frequent contributions to the Sunday Independent, Irish Times and Sunday Tribune, Leland received second place in the Munster Literature Centre’s 2003 Sean O’Faolain short story competition. She lives in Cork.

 

Readings: Danielle McLaughlin & Thomas Morris
in conversation with Jennifer Matthews

Danielle McLaughlinThomas Morris
23 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

Danielle McLaughlin’s stories have appeared in newspapers and magazines such as The Stinging Fly, The Irish Times, The South Circular, Southword, The Penny Dreadful, Long Story, Short and The New Yorker. She has won various awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition 2012, The From the Well short story competition 2012, The Willesden Short Story Prize 2013, The Merriman Short Story Competition 2013 in memory of Maeve Binchy, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition 2013. She was shortlisted for the Writing.ie Irish Short Story of the Year category in the Irish Book Awards in 2013 and 2014, and her story ‘The Dinosaurs on Other Planets’ was shortlisted for the Davy Byrnes Award 2014. Her debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs on Other Planets will be published in Ireland by The Stinging Fly Press in autumn 2015, and in the UK (John Murray), US (Random House) and Germany (Luchterhand) in 2016.

Thomas Morris is from Caerphilly, South Wales, and has been living in Dublin since 2005. He has worked with the Lilliput Press and The Stinging Fly, where he is the fiction editor. A writer of short stories, Thomas has published fiction in The Irish Times and The Moth, and in 2012 he received a literature bursary from the Arts Council of Ireland. During 2012-13, he was enrolled on the Creative Writing Prose MA at the University of East Anglia, where he won the Malcolm Bradbury Continuation Bursary. His first collection We Don’t Know What We’re Doing has just been published by Faber.

 

 

Readings: Toby Litt & Eliza Robertson
in conversation with Doireann Ní Ghríofa

Toby LittEliza Robertson

23 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

Toby Litt grew up in Ampthill, Bedfordshire. He has worked as a teacher, bookseller and subtitler. A graduate of Malcolm Bradbury’s creative writing course at the University of East Anglia, he is the author of two books of short stories, Adventures in Capitalism and Exhibitionism, and nine novels; most recently King Death. He is a Granta Best of Young British Novelist, and won the Manchester Fiction Prize 2009 with his story ‘John and John’. He teaches at Birkbeck College.

Eliza Robertson was born in Vancouver and grew up on Vancouver Island. She attended the creative writing programs at the University of Victoria and the University of East Anglia, where she received the 2011 Man Booker Scholarship. Her stories have been shortlisted for the Journey Prize and CBC Short Story Prize. In 2013, her story "We Walked On Water" co-won the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Her first collection, Wallflowers, came out this year with Hamish Hamilton Canada and Bloomsbury. She lives in England.

 

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THURSDAY

 

Films – Séamus Murphy: A Quiet Revolution & The Martyr


24 September at 11am
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: FREE

 

Seamus MurphySéamus Murphy: A Quiet Revolution is a film from Cork director Padraig Trehy. The Cork-born sculptor Seamus Murphy (1907-1975) was one of the foremost artists in Ireland in the middle decades of the twentieth-century. Apart from a year studying in Paris in the 1930s, Murphy spent his entire working life as an artist living in Cork City. Murphy’s struggle to survive as an artist mirrored that of the emerging nation around him. In his art and craft Murphy attempted to create work which would be distinctly Irish and would encourage others to look within the bounds of the island and not without, for inspiration. 59 minutes.

 

The MartyrThe Martyr is a TV adaption of a Frank O'Connor story, in which an IRA character played by one Ronald Reagan opens the door to a Free State officer played by Lee Marvin. (1954) Approx. 30 minutes.

 

 

 

Journal launch: Banshee
readings from the début issue

Banshee

24 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Banshee is a new journal of exciting, accessible, contemporary writing from Ireland and around the world. The journal will incorporate a variety of formats: short stories, flash fiction, poems and essays. Favourite themes include coming of age, sexuality, gender, mortality, complicated relationships of all shapes, the joys and frustrations of the creative life, our relationship with technology, and the extended adolescence of the 21st century. Banshee is edited by Laura Jane Cassidy, Claire Hennessy, and Eimear Ryan.

 

Readings: Aiden O'Reilly & Paul O'Reilly
in conversation with Cal Doyle

Aidan O'ReillyPaul O'Reilly

24 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Aiden O'Reilly has worked as a mathematics lecturer, translator, building-site worker, and property magazine editor. His fiction has appeared in The Stinging Fly, The Dublin Review, The Irish Times, Prairie Schooner, 3am magazine, and several anthologies. He won the biannual McLaverty Short Story Award in 2008. He received a bursary from the Arts Council to work on his short story collection Greetings, Hero which was published by Honest Publishing UK in September 2014.

Paul O'Reilly lives with his wife and children in Co. Wexford, Ireland. Longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, in 2015 Paul’s debut short story collection The Girl Missing from the Window was published to acclaim by Doire Press. His work has been published in the Irish Independent, the Irish TimesThe Stinging Fly, The Scaldy DetailNatural Bridge (US), the Bristol Prize Anthology (UK), online at NecessaryFiction.com (US), Writing.ie, TheJournal.ie and selected for The Lonely Voice series of readings at the Irish Writers’ Centre. An award winning Irish traditional singer, songwriter, lilter, and musician, Paul has produced and recorded on several albums, while also appearing on national radio, TV and with the Irish Chamber Orchestra.

 

 

Readings: Marie-Helene Bertino & Siddhartha Gigoo
in conversation with Jennifer Matthews

Marie-Helene BertinoSiddhartha Gigoo
24 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

 

Marie-Helene Bertino’s debut novel 2 A.M. AT THE CAT’S PAJAMAS is a Barnes & Noble Fall ’14 Discover Great New Writers pick. It is an NPR Best Book of 2014, and a Best Book of the Year at Flavorwire, Buzzfeed, Popsugar, The Kansas City Star, and others. Her collection of short stories SAFE AS HOUSES received The 2012 Iowa Short Fiction Award, judged by Jim Shepard. Marie-Helene teaches in the Creative Writing Program at NYU and in the low-residency M.F.A. program at The Institute for Indian American Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, The Center for Fiction, The Sackett Street Workshops, and the Emerging Writer’s Workshop for One Story, where she was the Associate Editor. She has worked as a biographer for people living with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

 

Siddhartha Gigoo studied English Literature at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India. He is the author of two books of fiction, The Garden of Solitude (2011) and A Fistful of Earth and Other Stories (2015). He has also written and directed two short films, The Last Day (which was selected for several international film festivals) and Goodbye, Mayfly. Two books of his poems, Fall and Other Poems and Reflections – written as a student – were published by Writer’s Workshop, Kolkata, India.

 

Readings: Kelly Link & Heather O'Neill
in conversation with Alannah Hopkin

Kelly LinkHeather O'Neill

24 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

 

Kelly Link is the author of the collections Stranger Things Happen, Magic for Beginners, Pretty Monsters, and Get in Trouble. Her short stories have been published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, The Best American Short Stories, and Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards. She has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. She and Gavin J. Grant have co-edited a number of anthologies, including multiple volumes of The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and, for young adults, Steampunk! and Monstrous Affections. She is the co-founder of Small Beer Press and co-edits the occasional zine Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. Link was born in Miami, Florida. She currently lives with her husband and daughter in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Heather O'Neill’s first novel, Lullabies for Little Criminals, earned accolades around the world, including being named winner of Canada Reads 2007 and the Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction, and being a finalist for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction and the Orange Prize. She published her second novel The Girl Who Was Saturday Night in 2014. It was a shortlisted nominee for the 2014 Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her short story collection Daydreams of Angels was published in 2015. She is a regular contributor to CBC Books, CBC Radio, National Public Radio, The New York Times Magazine, The Gazette (Montreal) and The Walrus. She was born in Montreal, where she currently lives.


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FRIDAY

 

Films—Writer in Profile: William Trevor,
Writer in Profile: Edna O'Brien, & BBC Monitor: Frank O'Connor

Edna O'Brien

25 September at 11am
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: FREE

 

Full program approx. 60 minutes

Writer in Profile: William Trevor. (RTE) Novelist and short-story writer William Trevor was born in Mitchelstown, County Cork, in the Republic of Ireland on 24 May 1928. William Trevor is one of the most prolific writers to have emerged from modern Ireland. He has written close to twenty novels, fifteen collections of short stories, he has produced eleven theatre plays, thirteen radio plays and over thirty-seven television scripts. In 1977 he received a CBE and has won Whitbread awards in 1976, 1983, 1994 and 1995.

Writer in Profile: Edna O'Brien. (RTE) Irish novelist and short-story writer Edna O'Brien was born on 15 December 1930 in Tuamgraney, County Clare, Ireland. Edna O'Brien is the author of The Country Girls Trilogy, The Light of Evening, Saints and Sinners, Country Girl, and other widely acclaimed books. She has lived in London for many years.

Monitor: Frank O'Connor
(BBC Monitor, 1961). Not only an insightful glimpse into O'Connor the man and writer, but also an affecting portrait of Cork city more than fifty years ago.

 

 

Seán Ó Faoláin Prize-Giving & Reading

Fiction

25 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

The Sean O’Faolain Prize awarded to the best single story entered in competition from anywhere in the world. The first prize is €2000. The winner also receives a week’s residency at the Anam Cara artist retreat in West Cork and publication of their winning story in Southword. The winner, if they choose to travel to Cork for this event, also receives accommodation with meals for the duration of the festival and entry into all events. This occasion is an opportunity to hear the winning story and the judge’s citation from Danielle McLaughlin. The competition is now closed for submissions.

 

Out of the Slushpile: craft talk by Marie-Helene Bertino

Marie-Helene Bertino

25 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library (Grand Parade)
Admission: FREE

 

Marie-Helene Bertino will be sharing personal stories about rejection. She’ll give practical advice as a writer and ex-lit mag editor on how to get out of the slush pile. Sub-topics will include: the story that was rejected 35 times before winning a Pushcart! The mistakes writers make when writing cover letters/ dealing with editors/ managing social media. How you know what a lit mag publishes without purchasing 100 subscriptions.

Marie-Helene Bertino’s debut novel 2 A.M. AT THE CAT’S PAJAMAS is a Barnes & Noble Fall ’14 Discover Great New Writers pick. It is an NPR Best Book of 2014, and a Best Book of the Year at Flavorwire, Buzzfeed, Popsugar, The Kansas City Star, and others. Her collection of short stories SAFE AS HOUSES received The 2012 Iowa Short Fiction Award, judged by Jim Shepard. Marie-Helene teaches in the Creative Writing Program at NYU and in the low-residency M.F.A. program at The Institute for Indian American Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, The Center for Fiction, The Sackett Street Workshops, and the Emerging Writer’s Workshop for One Story, where she was the Associate Editor. She has worked as a biographer for people living with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

 

The Long Gaze Back: An Anthology of Irish Women Writers
Reading by Mary Costello & Éilís Ní Dhuibhne; conversation with editor Sinéad Gleeson.

The Long Gaze BackMary CostelloÉilís Ní Dhuibhne
25 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

This new anthology of 30 short stories features classic and contemporary women writers,  including Mary Lavin, Anne Enright, Maeve Brennan, Eimear McBride, Christine Dwyer Hickey, Lisa McInerney, Norah Hoult, Belinda McKeon and more. This event features two of the contributors and will be chaired by the anthology Editor, Sinéad Gleeson.

Mary Costello, originally from Galway, lives in Dublin. Her first book, a collection of short stories entitled The China Factory, was nominated for the 2012 Guardian First Book Award. Her novel, Academy Street, was named Irish Book of the Year 2014 and was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award.

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne was born in Dublin in 1954 and is a graduate of UCD. For the past five years she has taught Creative Writing on the MA in Creative Writing in University College Dublin.  She has written over 24 books, including  novels, collections of short stories, several books for children, plays and non-fiction works. She writes in both Irish and English. She has won The Bisto Book of the Year Award, the Readers' Association of Ireland Award, the Stewart Parker Award for Drama, the Butler Award for Prose from the Irish American Cultural Institute and several Oireachtas awards for novels and plays in Irish. The novel The Dancers Dancing was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her stories are widely anthologized and translated. Her latest collection of short stories, The Shelter of Neighbours, was published in 2012. She was elected to Aosdána, the Irish Association of Artists, in 2004.

Sinéad Gleeson is a freelance broadcaster and journalist. She currently presents The Book Show on RTE Radio One and is a reporter on the RTE Television arts show, The Works. She reviews books and writes arts features and interviews for The Irish Times, and is a regular critic on RTE Radio One’s Arena.  In the past she has written and reviewed for The Guardian, The Sunday Times, The Sunday Business Post, The Irish Independent, The Herald and Image Magazine.

 

Segun Afolabi & Ann Pancake
in conversation with Patrick Cotter

Segun AfolabiAnn Pancake

24 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

Segun Afolabi was born in Nigeria and brought up in the Congo, Canada and Japan. His stories have been published in various literary journals including Granta, the London Magazine, Wasafiri and the Edinburgh Review. He lives and works in London. He was awarded the Caine Prize for African Writing 2005 for his short story, 'Monday Morning', and shortlisted in 2015. His collection of stories, A Life Elsewhere, including the prize-winning story, was published by Cape in 2006. Afolabi's novel, Goodbye Lucille, was published by Cape in 2007.

Ann Pancake grew up in Romney and Summersville, West Virginia. Her new short story collection, Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley, was published by Counterpoint Press in February 2015. Pancake's collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless award, and she has also received a Whiting Award, an NEA Grant, a Pushcart Prize, and creative writing fellowships from the states of Washington, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies like The Georgia ReviewPoets and WritersNarrative, and New Stories from the South. She earned her BA in English at West Virginia University and a PhD. in English Literature from the University of Washington. She now lives in Seattle and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University. 

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SATURDAY

 

Panel Discussion: What Do Editors Want?

Flash Fiction

26 September at 2.15pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €9

 

A discussion on editorial taste and practice moderated by Eibhear Walshe, with panelists Kelly Link, Ladette Randolph, and Jen Hamilton-Emery

Eibhear Walshe, director of Creative Writing at the School of English, University College Cork interviews three prominent editors on what book and magazine editors are looking for in a short story writer.

Kelly Link is the author of the collections Stranger Things Happen, Magic for Beginners, Pretty Monsters, and Get in Trouble. Her short stories have been published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, The Best American Short Stories, and Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards. She has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. She and Gavin J. Grant have co-edited a number of anthologies, including multiple volumes of The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and, for young adults, Steampunk! and Monstrous Affections. She is the co-founder of Small Beer Press and co-edits the occasional zine Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. Link was born in Miami, Florida. She currently lives with her husband and daughter in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Ladette Randolph is editor-in-chief of the journal Ploughshares. She is the author of four books: two novels: Haven’s Wake and A Sandhills Ballad, the short story collection This is Not the Tropics, and the memoir Leaving the Pink House. In addition, she has edited four anthologies: A Different Plain, The Big Empty, and two volumes of the Ploughshares Solos Omnibus.

Jen Hamilton-Emery is editor and director of indie publisher Salt, home of the annual Best British Short Stories series, and Frank O’Connor prize winner, Carys Davies. Jen grew up in Glasgow and now lives by the coast in Norfolk. She claims to have the best job in the world.

 

 

Kirsty Gunn & Claire Keegan

Kirsty GunnClaire Keegan

26 September at 4.15pm
Triskel (Christchurch)
Admission: €9

 

Kirsty Gunn published her first novel with Faber in 1994 and since then has written five works of fiction and three short story collections. Translated in over twelve territories, and widely anthologised, her books have been broadcast, turned into film and dance theatre, and are the recipient of various prizes and awards, including Scottish Book of the Year 1997. A regular contributor to a range of international newspapers and magazines, she is also Professor of Writing Practice and Study at the University of Dundee, where she established and directs the writing programme. She lives in London and Scotland with her husband and two daughters. Her latest work is a collection of short stories, Infidelities Faber and Faber, which has won the 2015 Edge Hill Prize and was shortlisted for the Frank O'Connor Award.

Claire Keegan was born in 1968 and grew up on a farm in Wicklow. Her first collection of short stories, Antarctica, was completed in 1998. It announced her as an exceptionally gifted and versatile writer of contemporary fiction and was awarded the Rooney Prize for Literature. Her second short story collection, Walk the Blue Fields, was published to enormous critical acclaim in 2007 and won her the 2008 Edge Hill Prize for Short Stories. Winner of the Davy Byrnes Memorial Prize, her long short story, Foster is now published in a revised and expanded version by Faber and Faber. Claire Keegan lives in County Wexford, Ireland.

 

 

Frank O'Connor Short Story Award prizegiving & reading by 2015 laureate Carys Davies

Carys Davies

26 September at 8.15pm
Triskel Christchurch

Admission: €9

 

Carys Davies was born in Wales and now lives in Lancaster. She has published two collections of stories with Salt Some New Ambush (2007) and The Redemption of Galen Pike which has won this year’s Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Among her other honours she has received the V.S. Pritchett Memorial Prize, the Olive Cook Short Story Award and a Northern Writers’ Award.

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Cork International Short Story Festival 2014

 

Colin Barrett

 

Programme of Events 2014

The 2014 festival readings took place at the Triskel Arts Centre and Cork Central Library; additional events in honour of National Culture Night included venues such as Milennium Hall and Waterstones. The festival featured work by writers from Ireland and abroad, including Richard Ford, Nuala Ní Chonchúir, Rachel Trezise, Alison McLeod, Clive Sinclair, Laura Van Den Berg, Salley Vickers, and Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award Winner Colin Barrett. Additionally, the Davy Byrnes Anthology was launched, featuring work by Sara Baume and Danielle McLaughlin.

Afternoons events included readings featuring Northern Ireland writers, North American writers, and many accomplished writers from the UK and Republic of Ireland. Other events included a discussion 'The Long and the Short of It', and family-friendly readings on Culture Night.

Also on National Culture Night The Seán Ó Faoláin prize was presented by judge Joyce Russell to 2014 winner Susan Maier Moul, who read her story 'Pleasure'. After the launch and prizegiving, a reading by a miscellany of Cork writers was held, including contributions by William Wall, Mary Leland, Cónal Creedon, Liadain O'Donovan, Alannah Hopkin, Madeleine D'Arcy, Doireann Ní Ghríofa and Joseph Sweeney.

Four workshops were held at the Munster Literature Centre: a short story masterclass with Rachel Trezise, a poetry masterclass with Kristiina Ehin, Short Stories for Beginners with Jon Boilard, and 'Story to Novel' with Nuala Ní Chonchúir.

Download festival brochure.

 

 

Go to events on: Tuesday * Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday

 

 

TUESDAY

 

Richard FordRichard Ford

Event presented in association with University College Cork School of English

Tuesday, 16 September at 8pm
Triskel Christchurch
Admission: €15 / €12 concs.

 


Richard Ford is one of the world’s most famous authors. He has published seven novels including The Sportswriter and Canada and three collections of short stories. This autumn a fourth short story collection is forthcoming, as is Let Me Be Frank With You – a new novel featuring his character Frank Bascombe.

 

 

WEDNESDAY

 

Órfhlaith FoyleValerie SirrÓrfhlaith Foyle & Valerie Sirr

Wednesday, 17 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

Órfhlaith Foyle was born in Africa to Irish parents. Her first novel Belios was published by The Lilliput Press in 2005. Revenge, an anthology of her poetry and short fiction was published by Arlen House also in 2005. Her first full collection of poetry Red Riding Hood’s Dilemma was published by Arlen House in 2010 and later short-listed for the Rupert and Eithne Strong Award in 2011. Her first full collection of short stories Somewhere in Minnesota and Other Stories was published by Arlen House in 2011. The title story was also published in Faber and Faber’s New Irish Short Stories; edited by Joseph O’ Connor. Órfhlaith is currently writing her second novel. Arlen House have published her second collection of stories, Clemency Browne Dreams of Gin, this year.

Valerie Sirr’s debut collection of short stories is The Beautiful Rooms (Arlen House, 2014). Her short stories, short shorts, and poems are published in Ireland, UK, US, Australia and Asia. Honours include 2007 Hennessy New Irish Writer Award, Arts Council of Ireland literature bursaries, and other national and international literature awards. She holds an M. Phil. in Creative Writing from Trinity College, Dublin. For more information visit Valerie online at valeriesirr.wordpress.com

 

 

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Madeleine D'ArcySun WeiMadeleine D'Arcy & Sun Wei

Wednesday, 17 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

Madeleine D'Arcy lives in Cork City. In 2010 she received the Hennessy First Fiction Award and the overall Hennessy Award of New Irish Writer. Her début short story collection, ‘Waiting For The Bullet’ was published by Doire Press in April 2014. She’s currently a scholarship student on the inaugural MA in Creative Writing at University College Cork. For more information, please go to madeleinedarcy.com

Sun Wei is a Chinese novelist, short-story writer and essayist. She was born in 1973 in Shanghai and grew up in a family of intellectuals. She received her B.A. in Journalism from Fudan University in 1996 and her Master’s degree in International Business Administration from Shanghai University of Finance and Economics in 2001. She started writing fairy tales and novels in her teenage years. In her 20s, she worked as a director at Shanghai Television Station and later as the General Manager of a state-owned media company specialized in documentary and TV column production. In 2003, she quit her job and became a full-time writer and then she went into a period of maturation and high productivity. She regards writing as her fate and believes that a writer has an obligation to truthfully describe the times he/she lives in with his/her individual judgment.

 

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Nuala Ní ChonchúirMatt RaderNuala Ní Chonchúir & Matt Rader

Wednesday, 17 September at 7pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: €8 / €6 concs.



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Nuala Ní Chonchúir was born in Dublin in 1970; she lives in East Galway. Her critically acclaimed first novel YOU was published in 2010 by New Island. The same publisher brought out her fourth short story collection Mother America in 2012. A chapbook of flash Of Dublin and Other Fictions was published in the US in late 2013 by Tower Press and Nuala’s second novel The Closet of Savage Mementos appeared in April 2014 from New Island. Penguin USA and Penguin Canada will publish Nuala’s third novel, Miss Emily, about the poet Emily Dickinson and her Irish maid, in 2015.

Matt Rader is the author of three books of poems: A Doctor Pedalled Her Bicycle over the River Arno (House of Anansi, 2011), Living Things (Nightwood Editions, 2008), and Miraculous Hours (Nightwood Editions, 2005), which was a finalist for the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award and long-listed for the ReLit Award. His fiction, non-fiction, and poetry have appeared in The Walrus, Prism International, The Fiddlehead, and two editions of Best Canadian Poetry, as well as many other publications across North America, Europe, and Australia. Rader’s poetry and fiction has also been nominated for numerous awards, including the Journey Prize, the National Magazine Award, and the Pushcart Prize. Born and raised on Vancouver Island, he is core faculty in the Creative Studies Department at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. House of Anansi are publishing his first collection of short stories this year.


 

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Kristiina EhinRachel TreziseKristiina Ehin & Rachel Trezise

Wednesday, 17 September at 8.45pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: €8 / €6 concs.


 

Kristiina Ehin is the author of the short story collection Walker on Water. An internationally renowned poet, her collection The Drums of Silence was awarded the British Poetry Society Popescu Prize for European Poetry in Translation in 2007, and her collection 1001 Winters has been nominated for the same prize in 2013.  In her native Estonia, Ehin has published six volumes of poetry, three books of short stories and a retelling of South-Estonian folk tales. She has written plays, as well as poetic radio broadcasts.

Rachel Trezise was born in Wales, where she still lives. Her debut novel In and Out of the Goldfish Bowl won a place on the Orange Futures List in 2002. Harpers & Queen magazine voted her New Face of Literature, 2003. In 2006 her first short story collection, Fresh Apples won the inaugural International Dylan Thomas Prize. in 2014. Her second collection of short stories Cosmic Latte won Readers’ Choice in The Edge Hill Short Story Prize this year. racheltrezise.co.uk

 

 

 

THURSDAY

 

Jon BoilardBrendan MathewsJon Boilard & Brendan Mathews

Event presented in association with University College Cork School of English

Thursday, 18 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE


 

Jon Boilard was born and raised in Western Massachusetts. He has been living and writing in Northern California since 1986. His short stories have been published in literary journals in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia. His first novel A River Closely Watched was published by MacAdam Cage in 2012. His second novel The Castaway Lounge will be published next year. He was winner of the Seán Ó Faolain Prize in 2004. jonboilard.com

Brendan Mathews is the author of the novel THE WORLD OF TOMORROW and the short story collection LEAVETAKINGS, both forthcoming from Little, Brown & Co. His stories have twice appeared in Best American Short Stories (2010 and 2014) and in Virginia Quarterly Review, Southern Review, Cincinnati Review, and other magazines in the United States and UK. He is the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship to Ireland and an Artist Fellowship from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. He teaches at Bard College at Simon’s Rock.

 

 

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Patrick ChapmanJaki McCarrickPatrick Chapman
& Jaki McCarrick

Thursday, 18 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

Patrick Chapman has published six collections of poetry and one of short stories The Wow Signal (2007). A volume of two novellas The Negative Cutter has been published this year by Arlen House. He has written for film, radio and television including the Dr Who audio drama 'Fear of the Daleks' and the children’s tv series Garth and Bev.

Jaki McCarrick lives in Dundalk and has an M.Phil in Creative writing from Trinity. She is a playwright and short story writer and working on a novel. She has won many awards for her work including the Wasafiri Prize for New Writing and the SCDA National Playwriting Competition. Her debut short story collection The Scattering was shortlisted for the 2014 Edgehill Award.

 

 

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Lynn CoadyAlison MacLeodLynn Coady & Alison MacLeod

Thursday, 18 September at 7pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: €8 / €6 concs.


 

Lynn Coady was born and raised in Nova Scotia. She is the author of four novels and two short story collections. Her collection Hellgoing won the 2013 Giller Prize – Canada’s most prestigious literary award for fiction. She has written several plays, and contributes regularly to The Globe and Mail.

Alison MacLeod is a novelist, short story writer and essayist. Her third and most recent novel, Unexploded (Hamish Hamilton/Penguin Books), was long-listed for The 2013 Man-Booker Prize and selected as one of The Observer’s 'Books of the Year'.  Her previous works include the novels The Changeling (Macmillan, 1996) and The Wave Theory of Angels (Hamish Hamilton/Penguin 2005). She is also the author of the short story collection Fifteen Modern Tales of Attraction (Penguin, 2007).  Her stories have been widely published in the UK and abroad, and broadcast on the BBC.   In 2008 she was awarded the Society of Authors’ Prize for Short Fiction, in 2011 she was shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award, and in 2012 she was long-listed for The International Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award.   She has also won Writers Awards from Arts Council England and the Canada Council for the Arts.

 

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Hisham BustaniClive SinclairHisham Bustani
& Clive Sinclair

Thursday, 18 September at 8.45pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: €8 / €6 concs.

 

 

 

Hisham Bustani  (b. 1975, Amman, Jordan) writes fiction and has four published collections of short fiction: Of Love and Death (2008), The Monotonous Chaos of Existence (2010), The Perception of Meaning (2012), and Preludes to a Stalled Disintegration (2014). The German review Inamo has chosen him as one of the Arab world’s emerging and influential new writers, translating one of his stories into German for its special issue on “New Arab Literature” (No. 60, December 2009). He was listed among the best six contemporary Jordanian writers by theculturetrip.com. Acclaimed for his contemporary themes, style, and language, he experiments with the boundaries of narration and poetry.

Clive Sinclair was born in 1948. He grew up in North London and later studied at the universities of East Anglia and California at Santa Cruz. Sinclair has published four novels: Bibliosexuality: a novel (1973), Blood Libels (1985), Cosmetic Effects (1989) and Augustus Rex (1992). His short story collections include Bedbugs (1982), The Lady with the Laptop and Other Stories (1996) Clive Sinclair’s True Tales of the Wild West (2008) and Death and Texas (2014). His non-fiction works include The Brothers Singer (1983), a study of the Jewish-American writers Isaac Bashevis Singer and his brother Israel Joshua Singer, the memoir Diaspora Blues: A View of Israel (1987), and the autobiographical A Soap Opera From Hell: Essays on the Facts of Life and the Facts of Death (1998). He has returned to the Universities of East Anglia and Santa Cruz as a Guest Lecturer, specialising in creative writing, detective fiction, gothic fiction and Holocaust literature.

 

 

 

FRIDAY: National Culture Night
In honour of National Culture Night, all events are free of charge!

 

Charles BoyleMay Lan TanCharles Boyle & May-Lan Tan

Friday, 19 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 


Charles Boyle has published a number of poetry collections (for which he was shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot, Forward and Whitbread Prizes), a short novel (winner of the 2008 McKitterick Prize) and two books combining text and photography. He runs the small press CB editions. Last year he published his first book of stories The Manet Girl, with Salt Publishing.

May-Lan Tan grew up in colonial Hong Kong and was educated in British and American schools. Her parents are Dutch-speaking Chinese immigrants from Indonesia. She holds a BA in Fine Art and an MA in Creative Writing from Goldsmiths College. May-Lan's fiction has been published in Zoetrope: All-Story, Areté, and The Reader. Her debut collection, Things to Make and Break, was published by CB editions in March 2014.

 

 

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The Word Factory presents Writing from Northern Ireland

Lucy CaldwellPaul McVeighBernie McGill

Friday, 19 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

Lucy Caldwell was born in Belfast in 1981. She is the author of three novels and several plays and is currently working on her debut short story collection. Stories from the collection have so far been shortlisted for the BBC International Short Story Award and won the Commonwealth Writers Prize (Canada & Europe). Her website is lucycaldwell.com

Paul McVeigh's short stories have been published in anthologies and journals and been commissioned by BBC Radio 4. He recently read his work alongside David Nicholls on BBC Radio 5, at Belfast Book Festival and the International Conference on the Short Story in Vienna. Paul is the Director of the London Short Story Festival and is Deputy Editor at London's Word Factory. His novel 'The Good Son' is forthcoming from Salt Publishing  in 2015.

Bernie McGill is the author of Sleepwalkers, a short story collection short-listed for the Edge Hill Prize in 2014, and of the novel The Butterfly Cabinet. Her short fiction has been placed in the Seán Ó Faoláin, the Bridport, and the Michael McLaverty Short Story Prizes and she won the Zoetrope: All-Story Award in the US in 2010. She lives in Portstewart in Northern Ireland with her family. berniemcgill.com

 

 

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Writing CompetitionJohn W. SextonYoung Cork Poets
with John W. Sexton

Friday, 19 September at 5pm
Millennium Hall, City Hall, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

 

A very special reading by gifted Young Cork Poets who have participated in a writing workshop with John W. Sexton: Máirín-Rua Ní Aodha, Hassan Baker & Thomas Carr.

John W. Sexton is the author of five poetry collections including Petit Mal (Revival Press, 2009) and The Offspring of the Moon (Salmon Poetry, 2013). He also created and wrote The Ivory Tower for RTÉ Radio, which ran to over one hundred half-hour episodes from 1999 to 2002. Two novels based on the characters from this series have been published by the O’Brien Press: The Johnny Coffin Diaries and Johnny Coffin School-Dazed, which have been translated into both Italian and Serbian. He is a past nominee for The Hennessy Literary Award and his poem 'The Green Owl' won the Listowel Poetry Prize 2007. Also in 2007 he was awarded a Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellowship in Poetry.


 

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Louise O'NeillLouise O'Neill

Friday, 19 September at 6pm
Millennium Hall, City Hall, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

 

Louise O'Neill is from Clonakilty in West Cork. After graduating from Trinity College Dublin with an honours BA in English Studies, she moved to New York to work for the senior Style Director of ELLE magazine. She returned to Ireland in 2011 to write her critically acclaimed debut novel, Only Ever Yours, which has been described as The Handmaid’s Tale meets Mean Girls.

 

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Flash FictionFlash Fiction: Rapid Fire

Friday, 19 September at 6.45pm - 8pm
Waterstones, Patrick's Street, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

 

In celebration of National Culture Night – a free event consisting of rapid fire readings by a selection of festival authors and specially invited others. Listen to humour, tragedy and sometimes sheer weirdness. Each story will be less than 500 words long so feel free to stay for the whole event or come and go as you please.

 

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Seán Ó Faoláín CompetitionSeán Ó Faoláin Prize Presentation & Cork Literary Miscellany

Friday, 19 September at 8.30pm
Millennium Hall, City Hall, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

As part of National Culture Night, the presentation of a prestigious prize followed by a miscellany of Cork writers and musicians presenting a varied programme, full of memoir, history, humour, and sadness. Each piece is five minutes long so feel free to stay for the whole event or come and go as you please. Among the featured writers: William Wall, Mary Leland, Cónal Creedon, Liadain O'Donovan, Alannah Hopkin, Madeleine D'Arcy, Doireann Ní Ghríofa and Joseph Sweeney.

The Sean O’Faolain Prize is worth €2,000 and is presented each year to the best single short story under 3,000 words entered in competition. This year’s judge has been Joyce Russell and at time of going to press the winner is unknown.

 

 

 

 

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SATURDAY

 

 

The Long and the Short of It: a discussion on long form fiction.

Nuala Ní ChonchúirPatrick ChapmanJennifer Matthews

Saturday, 20 September at 2.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: €7 / €5 concs.


A discussion on long forms in fiction, including long short stories, novellas and novels. Moderated by Long Story, Short Journal editor Jennifer Matthews with writers Nuala Ní Chonchúir and Patrick Chapman.

Nuala Ní Chonchúir was born in Dublin in 1970; she lives in East Galway. Her critically acclaimed first novel YOU was published in 2010 by New Island. The same publisher brought out her fourth short story collection Mother America in 2012. A chapbook of flash Of Dublin and Other Fictions was published in the US in late 2013 by Tower Press and Nuala’s second novel The Closet of Savage Mementos appeared in April 2014 from New Island. Penguin USA and Penguin Canada will publish Nuala’s third novel, Miss Emily, about the poet Emily Dickinson and her Irish maid, in 2015.

Patrick Chapman has published six collections of poetry and one of short stories The Wow Signal (2007). A volume of two novellas The Negative Cutter has been published this year by Arlen House. He has written for film, radio and television including the Dr Who audio drama 'Fear of the Daleks' and the children’s tv series Garth and Bev.

Jennifer Matthews writes poetry and book reviews, and is editor of the Long Story Short literary journal. Her poetry has been published in The Stinging Fly, Mslexia, Revival, Necessary Fiction, Poetry Salzburg, Foma & Fontanelles and Cork Literary Review, and anthologised in Dedalus's collection of immigrant poetry in Ireland, Landing Places (2010).

 

 

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Laura Van Den BergSalley VickersLaura van den Berg
& Salley Vickers

Saturday, 20 September at 4.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork

Admission: €8 / €6 concs.

 

 

 

Laura van den Berg was raised in Florida and earned her M.F.A. at Emerson College. Her first collection of stories, WHAT THE WORLD WILL LOOK LIKE WHEN ALL THE WATER LEAVES US (Dzanc Books, 2009), was a Barnes & Noble "Discover Great New Writers" selection and shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Award. Her second collection of stories, THE ISLE OF YOUTH, published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in November 2013, won the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters and was named a "Best Book of 2013" by over a dozen venues, and was also shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Her first novel, FIND ME, will be published by FSG in February 2015. The recipient of a 2014 O. Henry Award, Laura currently lives in the Boston area and is the 2014-2015 Faculty Fellow in Fiction at Colby College.

Salley Vickers (born 1948 in Liverpool) has published eight novels including the word-of-mouth bestseller Miss Garnet's Angel, Mr. Golightly's Holiday, The Other Side of You and Where Three Roads Meet, a retelling of the Oedipus myth to Sigmund Freud in the last months of his life. Her short stories are collected in the volume Aphrodite’s Hat.

 

 

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Book Launch: Davy Byrnes Short Story Award 2014 Anthology with readings by Sara Baume & Danielle McLaughlin

Sara BaumeDanielle McLaughlin

Saturday, 20 September at 7 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: €8 / €6 concs.

 

 


 

Sara Baume was born in Lancashire in 1984. She grew up in Co Cork and studied fine art at Dun Laoghaire College of Art and Design before completing the MPhil in creative writing at Trinity College Dublin. Her short stories have been published in the Moth, the Stinging Fly and the Irish Independent as part of the Hennessy New Irish Writing series. Her reviews and articles on visual art and books have also appeared online and in print. Her debut novel, Spill Simmer Falter Wither, will be published by Tramp Press next year.

Danielle McLaughlin lives in County Cork. Her stories have been published widely in periodicals and anthologies. She won the Writing Spirit Award for Fiction 2010, a WOW!2 Award for Fiction in 2011, the From the Well Short Story Competition 2012, and the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition 2012. A full length collection is due from Stinging Fly Press in 2015.

 

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Presentation of the 2014 Frank O'Connor Short Story Award with reading by Colin Barrett

Young SkinsColin Barrett

Saturday, 20 September at 8.45 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: €8 / €6 concs.

 

 



First presented in 2005 when Cork City was European Capital of Culture the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award remains, at €25,000, the world’s most lucrative award for a collection of short stories. By the calibre of its past winners including Yiyun Li, Haruki Murakami, Miranda July, Jhumpa Lahiri, Simon Van Booy, Ron Rash, Edna O’Brien and Nathan Englander, it has also established itself as the world’s most prestigious international short story award. Established and presented by the Munster Literature Centre it is generously funded by Cork City Council.

Colin Barrett was born in 1982 and grew up in County Mayo. In 2009 he completed his MA in Creative Writing at University College Dublin and was awarded the Penguin Ireland Prize. His work has been published in The Stinging Fly magazine and in the anthologies, Sharp Sticks, Driven Nails (Stinging Fly Press, 2010) and Town and Country (Faber and Faber, 2013). Barrett received bursaries from the Arts Council in 2011 and 2013. Young Skins his first collection of stories and won the 2014 Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award.

 

 

 

Cork International Short Story Festival 2013

 

David Constantine

Photo © John Minihan

 

Programme of Events 2013

The 2013 festival readings took place at the Triskel Arts Centre, Gael-Taca and Cork Central Library, featuring work by writers from Ireland and abroad, including Alistair MacLeod, Donal Ryan, Deborah Levy, Michelle Roberts, Adam Marek, and Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award Winner David Constantine. Additionally, Cork writer Billy O'Callaghan's The Things We Lose, The Things We Leave Behind was launched.

Afternoons events included readings featuring west of Ireland writers, Gaelgoiri writers, and writers known for pushing the boundaries of the short story form. Other events included a discussion on editing short story anthologies, a lecture on 'How to Prepare a Manuscript' with Declan Meade, and showcases of anthologies including Wordlegs' 30 Under 30 and Kevin Barry's Town and Country.

On National Culture Night The Seán Ó Faoláin prize was presented to 2013 winner Molia Dumbleton, who read her story 'The Way We Carried Ourselves' at an event where an anthology, Pigs' Feet, White Socks, and Hoovers, was launched, marking the 10th anniversary of the Seán Ó Faoláin Prize. After the launch and prizegiving, a flash fiction reading was held.

Unique to this year's events was a viewing of graphic fiction with publications by Etgar Keret and Carol Swain projected onto the big screen at the Triskel Arts Centre.

Five workshops were held at the Munster Literature Centre: Crime Writing with Owen Hill, 'The Uncanny' with Alannah Hopkin, Short Stories for Beginners with Jon Boilard, a fiction masterclass with Michele Roberts and a photography workshop, 'The Picture Story', with John Minihan.

Download festival brochure.

 

 

Go to events on: Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday * Sunday

 

 

WEDNESDAY

 

 

The Things We Lose, The Things We Leave Behind
by Billy O'Callaghan
: book launch by a Cork writer

The Things We Lose, The Things We Leave BehindBilly O'Callaghan

Wednesday, 18 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

We are pleased to host the launch of a new collection of stories by a Cork writer.

Billy O'Callaghan was born in Cork in 1974, and is the author of two previous short story collections: In Exile (2008) and In Too Deep (2009). Over the past decade, more than seventy of his stories have appeared in a wide variety of literary journals and magazines around the world.  He has also written for the Irish Examiner, the Evening Echo and the Irish Times.His stories have won and been shortlisted for numerous honours, including the George A. Birmingham Award, the Lunch Hour Stories Prize, the Molly Keane Creative Writing Award, the Sean O’Faolain Award, the RTE Radio 1 Francis MacManus Award, the Faulkner/Wisdom Award, the Glimmer Train Prize and the Writing Spirit Award. http://billyocallaghan.co.uk/en/

 

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'30 Under 30' Anthology: readings by four new writers

Cal DoyleLouise HegartyNoel O'ReganJames O'Sullivan

Wednesday, 18 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

30 under 30 is an anthology edited by Elizabeth Reapy of Wordlegs, published by Doire Press. A selection of mostly Cork contributors will read from this new anthology showcasing Ireland’s youngest fiction-writing talent.

Cal Doyle is a Cork-based writer. He has published poetry widely in journals. He was selected to read as part of Poetry Ireland’s Introductions Series in May 2012 and is poetry editor of Wordlegs.

Louise Hegarty lives in Cork. She won the iYeats Emerging Writer Poetry Competition and has been shortlisted for the RTE Guide/Penguin Ireland Short Story Competition, the Writing Spirit Award 2011, the 2012 Flatt Prize for Literature and the 2012 Over the Edge New Writer of the Year Competition.

Noel O'Regan was born in Tralee. He has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and is the recipient of a 2012 Leonard A. Koval Memorial Prize. He was the 2nd prize winner in the 2011 Writing Spirit Short Story Award, was longlisted for the 2012 Bristol Short Story Prize. He lives in London.

James O'Sullivan is a native of Cork. He has published a collection of poetry with Lapwing: Kneeling on the Redwood Floor (2011). His work has appeared in numerous periodicals and anthologies including Revival, Bray Arts Journal and the Southern Star.

 

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Donal Ryan: reading by 2013 Man Booker Prize Longlistee

Donal Ryan

Wednesday, 18 September at 7pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Tickets available at door.


paypal

Donal Ryan was born in a village in North Tipperary, a stroll from the shores of Lough Derg. He now lives and works in Co. Limerick. His debut novel The Spinning Heart was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize this year. The novel is told from the viewpoint of 21 people, each with their own story of struggling to get by, in a rural Munster village after Ireland’s financial collapse. His second novel The Thing About December is due for publication this autumn.   

 

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Etgar Keret & Adam Marek: readings and discussion

Wednesday, 18 September at 8.45pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Tickets available at door.

Adam MarekEtgar Keret

 

 

 

 

Two writers renowned for their offbeat humorous stories.

Etgar Keret is one of the leading voices in Israeli literature and cinema. He is the author of five bestselling collections which have been translated into twenty-nine languages. He has won the Camera d’Or prize at Cannes, received the Chevallier medallion of France’s Order of Arts & Letters and has been shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award twice. http://www.etgarkeret.com/

Adam Marek is the author of two short story collections – Instruction Manual For Swallowing and The Stone Thrower – both published by Comma Press. He won the 2011 Arts Foundation Short Story Fellowship, and was shortlisted for the inaugural Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. His stories have appeared in many magazines and anthologies, including Prospect and The Sunday Times Magazine, and The Best British Short Stories 2011 and 2013. Visit Adam online at www.adammarek.co.uk


 

 

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THURSDAY

 

 

Aileen Armstrong & Alan McMonagle: readings & discussion

Alan McMonagleAileen Armstrong
Thursday, 19 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

A reading and talk with two young writers from the west of Ireland who have just published their first books.

Aileen Armstrong lives in Galway. In 2009 she graduated from the MA in Writing programme at NUIG, and in 2010 she received a Literature Bursary Award from the Arts Council of Ireland. Her writing has been published in The Stinging Fly, Three Times Daily, Cuadrivio, Some Blind Alleys and The Long Story, Short, as well as in the Galway Stories anthology. End of Days, which has received Arts Council funding, is her debut collection of short stories (Doire Press, 2013).

Alan McMonagle is a poet, playwright and short fiction writer living in Galway. He has received awards for his work from the Professional Artists’ Retreat in Yaddo (New York), the Fundación Valparaiso (Spain), the Banff Centre for Creativity (Canada) and the Arts Council of Ireland. He has contributed stories to many journals in Ireland and North America including The Adirondack Review, Natural Bridge, Grain, Prairie Fire, The Stinging Fly and Southword. Liar Liar, his first collection of stories, appeared in 2008 (Wordsonthestreet). The title story from his second collection, Psychotic Episodes, (Arlen House, 2013) was nominated for a 2011 Pushcart Prize. http://www.alanmcmonagle.com/

 

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Dave Lordan & Marie-Helene Bertino: readings & discussion

Marie-Helene BertinoDave Lordan

Thursday, 19 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

A reading and talk with young prizewinning authors from Ireland and the USA.

Dave Lordan poet, playwright, story writer was born in Derby, England, and grew up in Clonakilty in West Cork. He has published two poetry collections and a book of short fiction First Book of Frags. Among the honours he has received are The Patrick Kavanagh Prize, The Strong Award and Arts Council bursaries. http://davelordanwriter.com/

Marie-Helene Bertino's debut collection of stories, Safe as Houses received The 2012 Iowa Short Fiction Award, The Pushcart Prize, and was long-listed for The Story Prize and The Frank O'Connor International Short Story Prize. Her debut novel, 2 AM at the Cat's Pajamas, is forthcoming from Crown (Picador UK). She was an Emerging Writer Fellow at New York City's Center for Fiction and currently works as a biographer for people living with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). For more information, visit www.mariehelenebertino.com, or follow her on Twitter @mhbertino.  

 

 

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The Graphic Short Story with Etgar Keret & Carol Swain

Thursday, 19 September at 7pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Tickets available at door.

Carol SwainEtgar Keret
 






A projection of graphic short stories by authors with international reputations followed by a live discussion with the authors. WARNING: will feature adult sexual themes, not suitable for under 16s.

Etgar Keret is one of the leading voices in Israeli literature and cinema. He is the author of five bestselling collections which have been translated into twenty-nine languages. He has won the Camera d’Or prize at Cannes, received the Chevallier medallion of France’s Order of Arts & Letters and has been shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award twice. http://www.etgarkeret.com/

Born 1962 in London, Carol Swain was raised in Wales. She studied painting at art college and began publishing her comics in 1987. She has since completed two graphic novels and an anthology. She has completed her third graphic novel entitled Gast. She lives in London.

 

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Deborah Levy & Michèle Roberts: readings and discussion

Michèle RobertsDeborah Levy

Thursday, 19 September at 8.45pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Tickets available at door.

 


 

Deborah Levy writes fiction, plays and poetry. She is the author of highly praised books including Beautiful Mutants, Swallowing Georgraphy and Billy and Girl. Her most recent novel Swimming Home was shortlisted for the 2012 Man Booker Prize, the Specsavers National Book Awards and the Wingate Prize. Black Vodka was shortlisted for this year’s Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award.

Michèle Roberts has published twenty books, among them three collections of short stories, most recently Mud--Stories of Sex and Love, which was shortlisted for the Edgehill Prize. Her novel Daughters of the House won the W.H.Smith Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. She is Professor Emeritus at the University of East Anglia, a Fellow of The Royal Society of Literature and a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. She lives in London and in France.

 

 

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FRIDAY

 

 

Gearrscéalta le Angela Bourke & Micheál Ó Conghaile

Micheál Ó ConghaileAngela Bourke

Dé hAoine, 20 Meán Fómhair, 11am
Gael-Taca, Sullivan’s Quay, Corcaigh
Táille: SAOR

 

 

 


Angela Bourke writes in Irish and English, and taught at UCD until recently.  She won The Irish Times Literature Prize for non-fiction in 2000 with The Burning of Bridget Cleary: A True Story, and published Maeve Brennan: Homesick at The New Yorker in 2004.  New Island published her short-story collection in English, By Salt Water, in 1996, but she has published only a few stories in Irish, using the language of songs and folktales to work in her second language. 

Micheál Ó Conghaile was born in Connemara, County Galway. He has published poetry, short stories, a novel, plays, a novella and translations. Among his awards are the Butler Literary Award, the Hennessy New Irish Writer of the Year Award, the Stewart Parker Award and a Listowel Writers’ Week Award. His works have been translated into many languages. He is a member of Aosdána.

 

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Angela Bourke & Micheál Ó Conghaile: readings in English

Micheál Ó ConghaileAngela Bourke

Friday, 20 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Two authors who work in the Irish language will each read a story in English translation.


Angela Bourke writes in Irish and English, and taught at UCD until recently.  She won The Irish Times Literature Prize for non-fiction in 2000 with The Burning of Bridget Cleary: A True Story, and published Maeve Brennan: Homesick at The New Yorker in 2004.  New Island published her short-story collection in English, By Salt Water, in 1996, but she has published only a few stories in Irish, using the language of songs and folktales to work in her second language. 

Micheál Ó Conghaile was born in Connemara, County Galway. He has published poetry, short stories, a novel, plays, a novella and translations. Among his awards are the Butler Literary Award, the Hennessy New Irish Writer of the Year Award, the Stewart Parker Award and a Listowel Writers’ Week Award. His works have been translated into many languages. He is a member of Aosdána.

 

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On Preparing a Manuscript: Declan Meade

Declan Meade

Friday, 20 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

One of Ireland’s leading fiction editors and founder of the Stinging Fly presents a talk on how to prepare your manuscript for publication.

Declan Meade has published and edited The Stinging Fly magazine since 1998. From 1999 to 2004 he edited the James Joyce Bloomsday Magazine for the James Joyce Centre. In 2005 he set up The Stinging Fly Press that he continues to run in tandem with the magazine. He has edited two anthologies of short stories for the imprint, These Are Our Lives (2006) and Let's Be Alone Together (2008). He teaches a module on the business of publishing at the American College Dublin as part of their MFA in Creative Writing. www.stingingfly.org

 

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Culture Night Event: Seán Ó Faoláin Prize & Anthology Launch

Writing Competition

Friday, 20 September at 7pm
Millennium Hall, City Hall, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

The Sean O’Faolain Prize is worth €2,000 and is presented each year to the best single short story under 3,000 words entered in competition. This year’s judge has been Joyce Russell and at time of going to press the winner is unknown.

This year the Munster Literature Centre is proud to present a print anthology of a decade of excellence in the short story form--the winners of the Seán Ó Faoláin International Short Story Prize 2002 - 2012. This publication includes work by William Wall, Joyce Russell, Jon Boilard and many more.

 

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Culture Night Event: Flash Fiction Rapid Fire

Flash Fiction Rapid Fire

Friday, 20 September at 9.15pm
Millennium Hall, City Hall, Cork
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

In celebration of National Culture Night – a free event consisting of rapid fire readings by a selection of festival authors and specially invited others. Also taking part will be participants of the Flash Fiction Festival Workshop taught by Dave Lordan. Listen to humour, tragedy and sometimes sheer weirdness. Each story will be less than 500 words long so feel free to stay for the whole event or come and go as you please.

 

 

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SATURDAY

 

 

Short Story Anthologies & the editorial process: Discussion

Kevin BarryConsoleTwisted Truths30 under 30

Saturday, 21 September at 2.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Tickets available at door.

Editors and publishers of four recent anthologies discuss the importance of anthologies and the selection process with Irish author Nuala Ni Chonchuir. Participants will include Kevin Barry, Sinéad Gleeson, Micheál Ó Conghaile and Elizabeth Reapy.

 

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Town and Country: New Irish Short Stories. Readings by Julian Gough and Patrick McCabe. Discussion with Kevin Barry.

Saturday, 21 September at 4.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork

Tickets available at door.

Julian Gough Patrick McCabeKevin Barry

 

 

 

 

 

Two contributors to the recent Faber anthology, Julian Gough and Patrick McCabe will read and participate in a public interview with editor Kevin Barry.

Julian Gough sang on four albums by Toasted Heretic. He is the author of three novels Juno & Juliet, Jude in Ireland and Jude in London and a poetry collection Free Sex Chocolate. He has won the BBC National Short Story Award and has been shortlisted, twice, for the Everyman Bollinger Woodhouse Prize. http://www.juliangough.com/

Patrick McCabe was born in Monaghan in 1955. His novels include The Dead School, The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winter Wood. He has written for screen and stage and is currently working on a novel and a book of short stories. His latest book Goodbye Mr Fish/Hello Mr Rat will be published September 2013.

Kevin Barry is the author of the story collections Dark Lies The Island and There Are Little Kingdoms and the novel City Of Bohane. He recently won the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Prize. He has also been awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature and was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Prize and the Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year. His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Best European Fiction, the Granta Book of the Irish Short Story and many other journals and anthologies. His plays have been performed in Ireland and the US. He also works on screenplays, essays, and graphic stories. He lives in County Sligo.

 

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Steven Heighton & Manuel Gonzales: readings and discussion

Manuel GonzalesSteven Heighton

Saturday, 21 September at 7.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Tickets available at door.

 


 

Steven Heighton's most recent books are The Dead Are More Visible (stories) and Workbook, a collection of memos and fragmentary essays. His novel Afterlands appeared in six countries; was a New York Times Book Review editors' choice; was a best of year choice in ten publications in Canada, the USA, and the UK; and has been optioned for film. The Irish Examiner wrote of it, "A terrific read . . . the writing has an understated excellence . . . Heighton's descriptions of life on the ice are magnificent [and] he excels in telling a tale of hardship, madness, love, loyalty and sacrifice."  Heighton's poems and stories have received four gold National Magazine Awards. www.stevenheighton.com

Manuel Gonzales is a graduate of the Columbia University creative writing program. He is currently the executive director of Austin Bat Cave, a non-profit creative writing centre for students aged six to eighteen. The Miniature Wife and Other Stories is his first book.

 

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Alistair MacLeod: reading and interview with Sinéad Gleeson

Alistair MacLeod

Saturday, 21 September at 9 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Tickets available at door.

 


The Canadian master reads his work and participates in a public interview.  

Alistair MacLeod has long been recognized as one of Canada's greatest short story writers, based on his two collections, Lost Salt Gift of Blood (1976) and As Birds Bring Forth the Sun (1986). His first novel, No Great Mischief (1999) won the Canadian Booksellers Association Library Award, the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award and the Lannan Literary Award. It has been translated into numerous languages.

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SUNDAY

 

 

Presentation of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, followed by a reading by 2013 O'Connor Laureate: David Constantine
David Constantine

Sunday, 22 September at 7.30pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin Street, Cork
Tickets available at door.

 



First presented in 2005 when Cork City was European Capital of Culture the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award remains, at €25,000, the world’s most lucrative award for a collection of short stories. By the calibre of its past winners including Yiyun Li, Haruki Murakami, Miranda July, Jhumpa Lahiri, Simon Van Booy, Ron Rash, Edna O’Brien and Nathan Englander, it has also established itself as the world’s most prestigious international short story award. Established and presented by the Munster Literature Centre it is generously funded by Cork City Council. This year’s judges include John F. Deane, poet, publisher and short-story writer; Cathy Galvin, former deputy editor of The Sunday Times and founder of the Sunday Times Short Story Award and curator of the Word Factory in London; Brigid Hughes, former executive editor of The Paris Review and publisher/editor of A Public Space.

Born in Salford in 1944, David Constantine worked for thirty years as a university teacher of German language and literature. He has published several volumes of poetry, most recently, Nine Fathom Deep (2009). He is a translator of Hölderlin, Brecht, Goethe, Kleist, Michaux and Jaccottet. In 2003 his translation of Hans Magnus Enzensberger’s Lighter than Air won the Corneliu M Popescu Prize for European Poetry Translation. His translation of Goethe’s Faust, Part I was published by Penguin in 2005; Part II in April 2009. He is also author of one novel, Davies, and Fields of Fire: A Life of Sir William Hamilton. His three short story collections are Back at the Spike, the highly acclaimed Under the Dam (Comma, 2005), and The Shieling (Comma, 2009), which was shortlisted for the 2010 Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Constantine’s story ‘Tea at the Midland’ won the BBC National Short Story Award 2010. He lives in Oxford, where he edits Modern Poetry in Translation with his wife Helen.

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Cork International Short Story Festival 2012

 

Nathan Englander

Photo © John Minihan

 

Programme of Events 2012

The 2012 festival readings took place at the Triskel Arts Centre, featuring work by writers from Ireland and abroad, including John Banville, Zsuzsi Gartner, Kevin Barry, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, D.W. Wilson, Sarah Hall and Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award Winner Nathan Englander. Other readings included a showcase of contemporary fairy tales from the anthology My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me authors, and the launch of a very special Cork edition of Hamish Hamilton's Five Dials magazine. The Seán Ó Faoláin prize was presented to 2012 winner Sophie Hampton, who read her story 'White Socks and Weirdos' at the prizegiving story where Nathan Englander also received his prize.

The CISSF also featured post-readings interviews, a Short Story Stakeholder Showcase where the public had the chance to chat with publishers, plus discussions on flash fiction, and the short story in Canada.

Seven workshops were held at the Munster Literature Centre: Short Stories for Beginners with Nuala Ní Chonchúir, Advanced Short Story with Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Flash Fictin with Tania Hershman, Contemporary Fairytales with Kate Bernheimer, Story into Song with John Spillane, & Story onto Stage with Jack Healy.

 

Download festival brochure including timetable & map. (4.50MB)

 

Go to events on: Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday * Sunday

 

 

WEDNESDAY

 

 

Bloodlines by Joyce Russell: book launch by a new Cork writer

Bloodlines by Joyce RussellJoyce Russell

Wednesday, 19 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

We are pleased to host the launch of a new collection of stories by a Cork writer and from a Cork publisher.

Joyce Russell is a journalist and writer. Born in England she settled in West Cork more than thirty years ago and started writing short stories a decade ago. Her stories have won many prizes including the RTÉ Francis MacManus Short Story Award, the Séan Ó Faoláin Short Story Prize, the START Chapbook Prize and the Real Writers Short Story Award. Stories have been included in several anthologies and have been broadcast on radio. Bloodlines is her first published short story collection and is published by the Mercier Press.

 

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Siobhán Parkinson: reading & interview for young people

Siobhán Parkinson at the Cork International Short Story FestivalSiobhán Parkinson reading at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Wednesday, 19 September at 3pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Siobhán Parkinson was Ireland’s inaugural children’s laureate, Laureate na nÓg. She writes fiction for children and young people (and occasionally for adults). She has published more than twenty books since 1992, and her work has been translated into as many languages. She has won the Bisto Book of the Year award, she has received Bisto Merit and Honour Book awards four times, as well as two IBBY Honours and several White Ravens. Most recently she won an Oireachtas award. She is is currently commissioning editor and publisher with Little Island.

 

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Five Dials Literary Journal Launch

Five Dials at the Cork International Short Story FestivalCraig Taylor at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Wednesday, 19 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Five Dials is a highly respected online literary journal published by Hamish Hamilton in London but not limited to Hamish Hamilton authors. Edited by Craig Taylor, Five Dials has published poems, essays, memoir, short fiction and novel extracts from prestigious authors from all over the world. Distributed in Portable Document Format (PDF), Five Dials is best downloaded, printed out and enjoyed away from the computer. Typographically it is a work of art and every issue features wonderful, commissioned illustrations. For the September issue Craig Taylor has assembled a special issue drawing exclusively on writers participating in the Cork International Short Story Festival. The issue will go live internationally at this launch and Craig Taylor will be on hand to talk about Five Dials and his editorial priorities. Readings from the contributing writers will take place throughout the festival.

Craig Taylor’s non-fiction has appeared in the most prominent newspapers in three countries: The Guardian, The New York Times, and The Globe And Mail. His fiction has appeared in The Mississippi Review. He is the author of One Million Tiny Plays About Britain originally for The Guardian's Weekend magazine. Three of these plays were printed on handbags and given to the winners at the Cannes Film Festival. He has published his own photocopied magazines, including The Review of Everything I’ve Ever Encountered and Dark Tales of Clapham. His first book, Return To Akenfield, was published by Granta in 2006. More recently he has published  Londoners: The Days and Nights of London Now—As Told by Those Who Love It, Hate It, Live It, Left It and Long for It (Granta 2011)

 

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John F. Deane & Christine Dwyer Hickey: readings and discussion

Christine Dwyer Hickey at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJohn F Deane at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Wednesday, 19 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.


paypal

John F. Deane founded Poetry Ireland - the National Poetry Society - and The Poetry Ireland Review of which he is currently editor. He has published several collections of poetry and three novels with Blackstaff Press. With the Blackstaff Press he has also published several collections of short stories, notably The Coffin Master and Other Stories (2000) and most recently The Heather Fields and Other Stories (2007). Some of his fiction has been translated into German and published in that country and several collections have also been published in India.

“Deane is a brave writer and one of the finest living Irish storytellers” – The Times

Christine Dwyer Hickey is an award-winning novelist and short story writer. Twice winner of the Listowel Writers’ Week short story competition she has also been a prize-winner in the prestigious Observer/Penguin short story competition. She is the author of the Dublin Trilogy, The Dancer, The Gambler and the Gatemaker (1995-2000) which spans three generations of a Dublin family from 1913-1956. Her bestselling novel Tatty was chosen as one of the 50 Irish Books of the Decade, longlisted for the Orange Prize and shortlisted for the Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year Award. Her novel Last Train from Liguria was also a bestseller (Atlantic Books UK) and was nominated for the Prix L’Européen de Littérature. Her latest novel The Cold Eye of Heaven (Atlantic Books UK) has already received wide critical acclaim. She was shortlisted for the Hughes & Hughes Irish Book of the Year, 2011 and won the Irish Kerry Group Book of the Year in June 2012.     

“Hesitatingly wise... moving and persuasive.” Joseph O’Connor The Guardian

 

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Joe Dunthorne & Mike McCormack: readings and discussion

Mike McCormack at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJoe Dunthorne at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Wednesday, 19 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.

 

 

 

Joe Dunthorne was born and brought up in Cork’s sister city, Swansea. His debut novel, Submarine, was translated into fifteen languages and adapted into an award-winning film. He was shortlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award and has been a judge for the BBC National Short Story Award. His second novel, Wild Abandon, is out now.

“It is 60 years since JD Salinger invented teenage anxiety. The voice of the fragile Glass family and Holden Caulfield - damaged, precocious, confessional, self-obsessed, wearing irony against the emptiness of things - persists as about the most influential rhetoric of our lives: you can't imagine Morrissey or MySpace without it. It is, therefore, remarkable how much genuine life and surprise Joe Dunthorne brings to it in his perfectly pitched debut novel Submarine.” The Guardian

Mike McCormack was born in 1965 and comes from the West of Ireland. He is author of the novels Crowe’s Requiem and Notes from a Coma, the latter shortlisted for Irish Novel of the Year. His two collections of short stories are Getting it in the Head (Cape, 1996) and Forensic Songs which has just been published by Lilliput Press.

“Gives Ian McEwan and Edgar Allan Poe a run for their money ... The Irish short story is thriving and in the hands of writers like Mike McCormack it can only continue to.” Independent (London)

 

 

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THURSDAY

 

 

The Short Story in Canada: a discussion

Zsuzsi Gartner at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJohanna Skibsrud at the Cork International Short Story FestivalDW Wilson at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Thursday, 20 September at 2.30pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

On this side of the Atlantic when the subject of the Canadian short story arises people think of just two authors: Alice Munro and Alastair MacLeod. But Canada has a vibrant short story culture which sees dozens of books published each year by exciting voices. Here Festival Director Patrick Cotter leads three such voices (Zsuzsi Gartner, Johanna Skibsrud and D.W. Wilson) in a discussion to enlighten us on the state of the contemporary Canadian Short Story.

 

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Witi Ihimaera: reading & interview for young people

Witi Ihimaera at the Cork International Short Story FestivalWiti Ihimaera at the Cork International Short Story Festival
Thursday, 20 September at 3pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Witi Ihimaera is a New Zealand author of Māori and Anglo-Saxon descent. Ihimaera was the first Māori writer to publish both a book of short stories and a novel and most of his work consists of these genres. As a world leader in indigenous and Pacific literature, he has written a considerable number of books, with many notable works such as Tangi, Pounamu, Bulibasha and The Whale Rider (the last of which became a successful film of the same name). His stories generally portray Māori culture in modern New Zealand and his work often focuses on problems within contemporary Māori and New Zealand society.

 

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Flash Fiction readings by Tania Hershman & Nick Parker

Nick Parker at the Cork International Short Story FestivalTania Hershman at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Thursday, 20 September at 4pm
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 

 

Tania Hershman’s first collection of short stories and flash fiction, The White Road and Other Stories (Salt, 2008), was commended in the 2009 Orange Award for New Writers. Her second collection, consisting of 55 very short fictions, My Mother Was an Upright Piano: Fictions, was recently published by Tangent Books. She is currently writer-in-residence in the Science Faculty at Bristol University, working on a new collection of biology-inspired stories, funded by an Arts Council England grant. She is also founder and editor of The Short Review, an online journal which reviews short story collections and interviews their authors. She has been a fiction editor of Southword Online and a former judge of the Séan Ó Faoláin Short Story Competition.

By night, Nick Parker writes tiny tales, at an excruciatingly slow pace. They frequently turn up in anthologies and on the radio. His first collection, The Exploding Boy and other tiny tales (2011) was the first self-published fiction book ever to be reviewed by The Guardian. They said it was 'astonishing ... proof that the short story remains a public good'. By day he is creative director of the language consultancy The Writer. Ages ago he wrote a book all about toast, which Waterstone's described as a 'cult hit'. Before that, he was a cartoonist for Viz. He lives on the outskirts of town.

 

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Nuala Ní Chonchúir & D.W. Wilson: readings and discussion

D.W. Wilson at the Cork International Short Story FestivalNuala Ní Chonchúir at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Thursday, 20 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.

 

 

 

Nuala Ní Chonchúir was born in Dublin in 1970 and lives in Galway; she is a short story writer, novelist and poet. Her fourth short story collection Mother America and other stories was published this year. She has won many short fiction awards including The Jane Geske Award (USA) RTÉ radio’s Francis MacManus Award, the Cúirt New Writing Prize, the inaugural Jonathan Swift Award and the Cecil Day Lewis Award. She was shortlisted for the European Prize for Literature. She has also published You, a novel and several poetry collections. www.nualanichonchuir.com


D.W. Wilson was born and raised in British Columbia. He is the recipient of the University of East Anglia’s inaugural Man Booker Prize Scholarship. His stories have appeared in literary magazines across Britain, Canada and Ireland (including Southword). ‘The Dead Roads’ won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2011. His first collection of stories Once you Break a Knuckle has been published on both sides of the Atlantic this year. Wilson’s stories reveal to us how our best intentions can be doomed to fail or injure, how our loves can fall short or mislead us, how even friendship can be something dangerously temporary.

“ ‘The Dead Roads’ was the stand-out winner of the 2011 BBC Short Story Award. My worry was that it might also be the stand-out story in this debut collection, but no – the standard is consistently, astonishingly high throughout.” – Geoff Dyer

 

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Witi Ihimaera & Lysley Tenorio: readings and discussion

Lysely Tenorio at the Cork International Short Story FestivalWiti Ihimaera at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Thursday, 20 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs. Tickets at the door.


 

Witi Ihimaera is a multi-award-winning novelist descended from various tribes of New Zealand’s North Island. His first book, Pounamu Pounamu, a collection of stories, was followed by Tangi in 1973, which was the first novel by a Māori writer to be published. He is the author of thirteen novels, six collections of short stories and he has edited and compiled some highly regarded anthologies and works of non-fiction. His 1987 novel, The Whale Rider, was made into an internationally acclaimed film in 2002. His stories generally portray Māori culture in modern New Zealand and his work often focuses on problems within contemporary Māori and New Zealand society.

Pounamu Pounamu changed the face of literature in Aotearoa New Zealand, paving the way for what would later be known as the Māori Renaissance, an unprecedented flowering and recognition of Māori arts and literature in the 1970s … The book long ago achieved the status of a platinum bestseller (determined when a book has sold more than 50,000 copies in New Zealand), as have other subsequent books of Witi’s.” – Fiona Kidman.

Lysley Tenorio is the author of the story collection, Monstress, published by Ecco/HarperCollins. His stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Zoetrope: All-Story, Ploughshares, Manoa, The Chicago Tribune, and The Best New American Voices and Pushcart Prize anthologies.  A former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, he is a recipient of a Whiting Writer’s Award, the Nelson Algren Award for Short Fiction, a National Magazine Award nomination, and has received many other fellowships. Born in the Philippines, he currently lives in San Francisco, and teaches at Saint Mary’s College of California. Monstress introduces a bold new writer who explores the clash and meld of disparate cultures. Tenorio reveals the lives of people on the outside looking in with rare skill, humour and deep understanding.

“Tenorio’s characters walk tightropes strung between the Philippines and America, between illusions and reality, between family ties and the need to strike out alone. Monstress is a wonderful read: poignant, imaginative, somehow sad and funny all at once.” – Anthony Doerr

 

 

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FRIDAY

 

Discussion: Is Flash Fiction a True Literary Art Form or Just Something for Chancers?

flash fictionFriday, 21 September at 2.30pm.
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE


 

 

As a promotional gesture, Bloomsbury publishers in London, unilaterally proclaimed 2012 “The Year of the Short Story”. But if anything 2012 has turned out to be the year enthusiasm for Flash Fiction has gone viral, with competitions for short fiction pieces less than 500 or 200 words proliferating on radio, television and on the web. 2012 saw the British have their first National Day of Flash Fiction. On the Irish scene Powers Whiskey has offered the dizzying amount of €10,000 for a 450 word short story and the Irish Times started publishing flash fiction on a weekly basis. While the term flash fiction is a relatively recent coining to describe what used to be called short shorts, some people maintain that flash fiction has been around a long, long time and that Kafka and Borges were among the most eminent practitioners of the last century.

For those who feel it impossible to be satisfied by fiction without the meaty verisimilitude of a novel, the short story is a pallid, insubstantial thing. Many short story enthusiasts look similarly askance at flash fiction. This event wishes to examine whether such an attitude has any validity, asking is flash fiction a true literary art form or just something for chancers? Artistic Director Patrick Cotter will lead a selection of festival guest authors in discussion.

 

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Kevin Stevens: reading & interview for young people

Kevin Stevens at the Cork International Short Story FestivalKevin Stevens at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Friday, 21 September at 3pm.
The Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE

 

 


Kevin Stevens is the author of six books, including This Ain’t No Video Game, Kid!, a novel for young adults, and two novels for adults. He is also a consultant editor for Little Island, responsible for helping in the development of two series of illustrated stories for children.

 

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Short Story Stakeholder Showcase: exhibition by short story journals and competition organisers

Southword JournalStinging FlyThe MothFriday, 21 September
at 4pm.
Cork Central Library, Grand Parade
Admission: FREE


 

 

Short Story Showcase is an exhibition by Irish institutional stakeholders in the short story, consisting mainly of literary journals with a vested interest in keeping the short story alive and kicking in Ireland. Among the exhibitors will be Southword, The Stinging Fly and The Moth. All three magazines have published Irish and foreign writers of international repute, proving that they are not Irish literary journals per se but international literary journals based in Ireland. Come meet and greet the editors and discover some fabulous publications. There may also be the opportunity to meet book publishers and competition organisers.

 

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Johanna Skibsrud & Stephanie Powell Watts: readings and discussion

Stephanie Powell Watts at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJohanna Skibsrud at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Friday, 21 September at 7.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

 

 

Johanna Skibsrud is the author of the short fiction collection, This Will Be Difficult to Explain and Other Stories (Hamish Hamilton Canada 2011/ William Heinemann 2012), the 2010 Giller Prize winning novel, The Sentimentalists (William Heinemann 2011), recently short-listed for the Commonwealth Book Prize, and two collections of poetry, Late Nights With Wild Cowboys (Gaspereau 2008) and I Do Not Think That I Could Love A Human Being (Gaspereau 2010). Originally from Nova Scotia, Canada, Johanna currently lives in Tucson, Arizona where she is working on a second novel.

This Will Be Difficult To Explain And Other Stories is every bit as wise, poetic and probing as The Sentimentalists. Characters find themselves embedded in great – often tragically comic – misunderstandings, grappling to communicate with each other while fighting through the fog of their limited perspectives.  – Now (Toronto)

Stephanie Powell Watts is an associate professor at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA. Her debut short story collection We Are Taking Only What We Need was published earlier this year by BkMk Press of the University of Missouri-Kansas City and has been a 2012 PEN / Hemingway finalist, a Chautauqua award finalist, a finalist for the John Gardner Ficiton Book Award, a ForeWord Reviews finalist and a USA BookNews finalist. Her short fiction has appeared in a number of journals and anthologies including the 2008 Pushcart Prize anthology and the 2007 and 2009 editions of the New Stories from the South.

“In a strong debut Watts chronicles in ten stories the lives of black North Carolinians who come from or lived near ‘dark houses on tangled dirt roads on the fringes of the county.’ The kind of love found in the Carolina Hills – and in these stories – demands tribute.” – Publishers Weekly

 

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Zsuzsi Gartner & Sarah Hall: readings and discussion

Sarah Hall at the Cork International Short Story FestivalZsuzsi Gartner at the Cork International Short Story FestivalFriday, 21 September at 9.15pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

 


Zsuzsi Gartner is the author of the short fiction collections Better Living Through Plastic Explosives and All the Anxious Girls on Earth, the editor of Darwin’s Bastards: Astounding Tales from Tomorrow, and the creative director of Vancouver Review’s Blueprint BC Fiction Series. Her stories have been widely anthologized, and broadcast on CBC and NPR’s Selected Shorts. She has received numerous nominations and awards for her magazine journalism, and a 2007 National Magazine Award for fiction. She has been on faculty for the Banff Centre’s Literary Arts Programs and is an adjunct faculty member for UBC’s Optional Residency MFA in Creative Writing. Zsuzsi lives in Vancouver.

“Zsuzsi Gartner is a brilliant, mind-expanding writer, the kind who sneaks up on you with her darkness, her wit, her imagination, her humour, her political savvy.” The Globe and Mail

“ Zsuzsi Gartner’s writing is dazzling, effortless and clear as a bell. She’s able to crystallize a cultural moment in a way entirely her own that is both instantaneous and eternal.” – Douglas Coupland



Sarah Hall was born in Cumbria in 1974. She is the author of four novels, Haweswater, The Electric Michelangelo, The Carhullan Army and How to Paint a Dead Man, and the winner of, amongst others, the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the Betty Trask Award, the John Llewellyn Ryhs Prize and the Portico Prize for Fiction. The Electric Michelangelo was also shortlisted for the Booker Prize and longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction.

“Monstrous events happen offstage over the course of these seven stories: beatings, maulings, suicide and abandonment. But their force is felt all the more powerfully through the measured precision of Hall's prose, which is always grounded in the exact immediacy of everyday detail.” The Guardian

“Balancing muscularity with achingly beautiful prose, these stories are dark, raw and heartbreaking. An immensely satisfying and haunting collection.” – Clare Wigfall

 

 

Cork Culture Night: Flash Fiction Rapid Fire Reading

Flash Fiction Slam at the Cork International Short Story FestivalFriday, 21 September at 11pm.
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
Admission: FREE. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

 

In celebration of National Culture Night – a free event consisting of rapid fire readings by a selection of festival authors and specially invited others. Also taking part will be five authors drawn from the Flash Fiction Festival Workshop who will have the opportunity to compete for the Farmgate Cafe €200 Flash Fiction Award. Listen to humour, tragedy and sometimes sheer weirdness. Each story will be less than 500 words long so feel free to stay until midnight or come and go as you please.

 

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SATURDAY

 

 

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Contemporary Fairytales with Kate Bernheimer & Ilya Kaminsky
readings & discussion

Kate Bernheimer at the Cork International Short Story FestivalReadings from My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Saturday, 22 September at 2.30 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

 

Neil Gaiman, Michael Cunningham, Neil Labute, Joyce Carol Oates and more than thirty other extraordinary writers celebrate fairy tales in this thrilling volume—the ultimate literary costume party. Spinning houses and talking birds. Whispered secrets and borrowed hope. Here are new stories sewn from old skins, gathered from around the world by visionary author and editor Kate Bernheimer and inspired by everything from Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" and "The Little Match Girl" to Charles Perrault's "Bluebeard" and "Cinderella" to the Brothers Grimm's "Hansel and Gretel" and "Rumpelstiltskin" to fairy tales by Goethe and Calvino. Fairy tales are our oldest literary tradition, and yet they chart the imaginative frontiers of the twenty-first century as powerfully as they evoke our earliest encounters with literature. This exhilarating collection restores their place in the literary canon.

“I cannot remember a time I had more fun reading a book! Many of these contemporary tales rival the originals in creepiness, joy, and impact.” – Darcey Steinke

In this event emeritus professor of folklore Gearóid Ó Crualaoich leads editor/contributor Kate Bernheimer and contributor Ilya Kaminsky on a discussion of the place of the fairytale in adult reading in the 21st Century. There will be readings from the book and a chance for questions from the floor.

 

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Kevin Barry & Will Boast: readings and discussion

Will Boast to read at the Cork International Short Story FestivalKevin Barry

Saturday, 22 September at 4.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

 

 

Kevin Barry is the author of the story collections Dark Lies The Island and There Are Little Kingdoms and the novel City Of Bohane. He recently won the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Prize. He has also been awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature and was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Prize and the Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year. His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Best European Fiction, the Granta Book of the Irish Short Story and many other journals and anthologies. His plays have been performed in Ireland and the US. He also works on screenplays, essays, and graphic stories. He lives in County Sligo.

 

Will Boast was born in England and grew up in Ireland and Wisconsin and currently lives in San Francisco. His story collection, Power Ballads, won the 2011 Iowa Short Fiction Award. His fiction and essays have appeared in Best New American Voices, Narrative, Salon, Glimmer Train, The American Scholar, and The New York Times, among other publications. He's been a Stegner Fellow in fiction at Stanford University and a Charles Pick Fellow at the University of East Anglia. He’s currently working on both a novel and a memoir.
Power Ballads is not only a deeply felt look at the lives of musicians but also an exploration of the secret music that plays inside us all.

“Reading the stories in Power Ballads is like getting to know a new band: the lyrics get to you when you feel the least prepared and you laugh and cry and hope to find someone who laughs and cries with you. Will Boast is an exciting new voice.” – Yiyun Li

 

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Roshi Fernando & Éilís Ní Dhuibhne: readings and discussion

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne at the Cork International Short Story FestivalRoshini Fernando

Saturday, 22 September at 7.15 PM Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€8/€6 concs.
Tickets at the door.

 

We regret to report that, due to personal reasons, Fiona Kidman will be unable to attend the Cork International Short Story Festival as had been previously planned.

Roshi Fernando’s Homesick, linked stories about the Sri Lankan community in London, was short listed for the Sunday Times/EFG Short Story Award 2011 and won the 2009 Impress Prize for New Writers. She’ll be reading at the Small Wonder Festival in the UK as well this month, and has been previously longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. She was born and brought up in London. She was educated at the University of Warwick and is in the final year of a PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Swansea. Her story Three Cuts is published in the anthology Sing Sorrow Sorrow published by Seren in October 2010. Roshi has also been given a special commendation by the judges of the Manchester Fiction Prize, and has been longlisted for the Bridport Prize 2009. Roshi lives in Gloucestershire with her partner and four children.

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne was born in Dublin and is a graduate of UCD. She has PhD in Irish Folklore and her interest in folklore informs much of her own writing. She worked for many years as a librarian and now teaches creative writing at Trinity College Dublin and for the Faber Writing Academy. She has published more than twenty books, including six collections of short stories. She writes in Irish and English, for adults and children. Her stories are widely translated and anthologized, most recently in the Granta Book of the Irish Short Story and in Best European Fiction 2011. Her latest collection of short stories, The Shelter of Neighbours (Blackstaff Press), was published in March 2012. She has been the recipient of many awards including the Stuart Parker Award, three Bisto Awards and several Oireachtas awards.

 “Fiction, graced with head-versus-heart knowingness, about people on whom Ireland imposes timid choices and straitened lives.” – The New York Times

“Her prose shimmers like poetry.” – Edna O’Brien, The Observer

 

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John Banville & Lydia Davis: readings and discussion

Lydia Davis at the Cork International Short Story FestivalJohn Banville at the Cork International Short Story Festival

Saturday, 22 September at 9.15 PM
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin St, Cork
€15/€13 concs. Tickets at the door.

 


John Banville was born in Wexford in Ireland in 1945. Regarded as the most stylistically elaborate Irish writer of his generation, John Banville is a philosophical novelist concerned with the nature of perception, the conflict between imagination and reality, and the existential isolation of the individual. He has published one short story collection Long Lankin. His latest novel is entitled Ancient Light. He has been a recipient of the Booker Prize, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the Guardian Fiction Prize, the Premio Nonino and the Franz Kafka Prize. He is sometimes mistaken for the novelist Benjamin Black.

Lydia Davis is an American story writer, novelist, and translator. She is the author of six collections of stories and one novel, The End of the Story and most recently The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis. She is also the translator of numerous works of avant-garde French literature, including fiction by Maurice Blanchot and the autobiographical essays of Michel Leiris, as well as the Penguin Classic  Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust (Penguin UK, 2002) and Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Penguin UK, 2010). Among many other honours, she was named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government in 1999 and was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2003. She currently teaches at SUNY Albany and New York University.

 

 

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SUNDAY

 

 

Presentation of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award and the Seán Ó Faoláin Prize, followed by a reading by 2012 O'Connor Laureate: Nathan Englander

Yiyun LiHaruki Murakami winner of 2006 Frank O'Connor AwardMiranda July: 2007 Winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardJhumpa Lahiri: 2008 Winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardSimon Van Booy: 2009 winner of the Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardRon Rash: Winner of the 2010 Frank O'Connor International Short Story AwardEdna O'Brien

Sunday, 23 September at 7.30pm
Triskel Christchurch, Tobin Street, Cork
€10/€8 concs. Tickets at the door.

 

First presented in 2005 when Cork City was European Capital of Culture the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award remains, at €25,000, the world’s most lucrative award for a collection of short stories. By the calibre of its past winners including Yiyun Li, Haruki Murakami, Miranda July, Jhumpa Lahiri, Simon Van Booy, Ron Rash and Edna O’Brien it has also established itself as the world’s most prestigious international short story award. Established and presented by the Munster Literature Centre it is generously funded by Cork City Council. This year’s judges include the poet James Harpur, the novelist Mary Leland and the literary programmer Ann Luttrell.

The Sean O’Faolain Prize is worth €2,000 and is presented each year to the best single short story under 3,000 words entered in competition. This year’s judge has been Ian Wild and at time of going to press the winner is unknown.


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Cork International Short Story Festival 2011

 

Edna O'Brien by John Minihan

Photo © John Minihan

 

Programme of Events 2011

2011 saw the festival take the new name of 'Cork International Short Story Festival'. (Click here to read why the name changed.) Readings took place at the Metropole Hotel, featuring work by literary greats from Ireland and abroad, including those shortlisted for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award. Other readings included a showcase of Stinging Fly authors, an RTÉ/ Frances MacManus winner reading by professional actors, along with readings by the authors who won the Seán Ó Faoláin prize and the Hennessy Prize.

The CISSF also featured public interviews with many authors, a seminar on short story anthologies, a Frank O'Connor literary walking tour, along with the chance to borrow free 'Personal Mobile Short Story Festival' MP3 players, with short stories from from Aidan Stanley's Book on One radio series. An excellent festival blog was maintained by Elizabeth Rose-Murray.

Workshops were held at the Munster Literature Centre itself, including a beginners' workshop with California-based Irish writer Ethel Rohan. We also introduced our first four-day workshop which was for advanced students, facilitated by English writer Clare Wigfall.

The Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award was presented to Edna O'Brien and the Seán Ó Faoláin Prize went to P.G. O'Connor. O’Brien received a standing ovation as she accepted the award. “This is lovely, wonderful,” she said. “When Maureen Stapleton won an Academy Award, she said she’d like to thank everyone she’d ever met. I should probably limit that to Munster… I’d like to thank this wonderful festival for doing so much to stimulate the dying flower called literature.”

 

 

Download the festival timetable. (454 kb)

Download the festival brochure. (4.3 mb)

 

 

Go to events on: Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday * Sunday

 

WEDNESDAY

 

Helen Dunmore reading, with interview by Alannah Hopkin
Alannah Hopkin at the Cork International Short Story FestivalHelen Dunmore

Wednesday, 14 September at 7.30pm.
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

Helen Dunmore is a poet, novelist and children’s writer. Her poetry has won her the Cardiff International Poetry Prize, Alice Hunt Bartlett Award and Signal Poetry Award, and Bestiary was shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot Prize. Her latest Bloodaxe poetry titles are Out of the Blue: Poems 1975-2001 (2001) and Glad of These Times (2007). She has published ten novels and three books of short stories with Viking Penguin, including A Spell of Winter (winner of the Orange Prize for Fiction, 1995), Talking to the Dead (1996), The Siege (2001), Mourning Ruby (2003), House of Orphans (2006).

Alannah Hopkin has lived in County Cork since 1982. Her latest book is The Ship of Seven Murders, the true story of a tragic incident on board a ship sailing to Cobh in 1828, co-written with Kathy Bunney. She is also the author of Eating Scenery: West Cork, the People and the Place, an account of the people, past and present, who have made west Cork the place it is today. As a journalist she contributes occasionally to the Irish Arts Review, the Irish Examiner, and the Irish Times, and writes for Fodor Travel Publications and Insight Guides. She also writes about contemporary Irish art and is a member of the Association Internationale de Critiques d'Art (AICA). She is one of this year's judges for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.

 

 

Faber reading with Órfhlaith Foyle and Peter Murphy

Órfhlaith FoylePeter Murphy

Wednesday, 14 September at 9pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

Órfhlaith Foyle was born in Africa to Irish parents. Her first novel Belios was published by The Lilliput Press in 2005. Revenge, an anthology of her poetry and short fiction was published by Arlen House also in 2005. Her first full collection of poetry Red Riding Hood’s Dilemma was published by Arlen House in 2010 and later short-listed for the Rupert and Eithne Strong Award in 2011. Her first full collection of short stories Somewhere in Minnesota and Other Stories is to be published by Arlen House in 2011. The title story was recently published in Faber and Faber’s New Irish Short Stories; edited by Joseph O’ Connor. Órfhlaith is currently writing her second novel.

Peter Murphy was born in Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. His first novel John the Revelator was published in the UK and Ireland by Faber & Faber and in the US by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and was nominated for the 2011 IMPAC literary award and shortlisted for the 2009 Costa Book Awards. His short story ‘The Blacklight Ballroom’ was included in The News From Dublin, an anthology of Irish short stories, published by Faber and edited by Joseph O’Connor. One of Ireland’s most foremost arts writers, his journalism has been published in Rolling Stone, Music Week, the Irish Times, and he served as a contributing editor with Hot Press magazine. Peter is also a regular guest on RTE’s arts review show The View and has contributed liner notes to the forthcoming remastered Anthology of American Folk Music.

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THURSDAY

 

Canadian Writers Interview with Alexander MacLeod, Deborah Willis & Michael Christie by Clare Wigfall

Alexander MacLeodDeborah WillisMichael ChristieClare Wigfall

Thursday, 15 September at 4pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

Alexander MacLeod was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of short stories (Light Lifting--Biblioasis, 2010), was shortlisted for the Giller Prize, the Commonwealth Prize, two Atlantic Book Awards, and went on to become a national bestseller. Alexander holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill; he currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, in Canada.

Deborah Willis was born and raised in Calgary, AB. Her fiction has appeared in Grain, Event, Prism International, and The Walrus. Her first book, Vanishing and Other Stories, was named one of the Globe and Mail’s Best Books of 2009, and was nominated for the BC Book Prize and the Governor General’s Award. She has worked as a horseback riding instructor and a reporter, and currently works as a bookseller in Victoria, BC.

 

Michael Christie was born and raised in Thunder Bay, Ontario. He recently worked for six years in a homeless shelter on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, Canada’s poorest neighborhood, providing outreach to the severely mentally ill. His first book, The Beggar’s Garden, a collection of stories set in Vancouver, published by HarperCollins Canada, was released in early 2011. “Tenderness, whimsy, goofiness, brilliance — a polished gem of narrative.”- Globe and Mail. “The Beggar’s Garden is about as good as a first book can be.” – The Toronto Star. He holds an MFA from the University of British Columbia, and his fiction has been twice nominated for the Journey Prize, Canada’s top short story honour. He is also a former professional skateboarder, and is currently an editor for Color, a skateboard magazine based in Vancouver.

 

Clare Wigfall's debut collection of short stories The Loudest Sound and Nothing was published in 2007 to critical acclaim. In 2008 she won the internationally renowned BBC National Short Story Award for 'The Numbers', one of the stories from her collection. She currently lives in Berlin.

 

 

Suzanne Rivecca interviewed by Patrick Cotter

Patrick Cotter at the Cork International Short Story FestivalSuzanne Rivecca

Thursday, 15 September at 5pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

Suzanne Rivecca’s first book, Death is Not an Option was a finalist for The Story Prize, The PEN/Hemingway Award, and the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award. It is now shortlisted for the 2011 Frank O'Connor International Short Story award. She is the recipient of the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters as well as writing fellowships from Radcliffe and Stanford University. She is currently living in Rome and San Francisco, CA.

Patrick Cotter is a writer and publisher, and the Artistic Director of the Munster Literature Centre. Educated at UCC, he has published several chapbooks of his poems including The Misogynist’s Blue Nightmare (Raven Arts Press), A Socialist’s Dozen (Three Spires Press), and The True Story of Aoife and Lir’s Children & other poems (Three Spires Press). His first collection, Perplexed Skin, was published by Arlen Press in 2008. His second collection, Making Music, was published in early 2009 by Three Spires Press.

 

Canadian Writers Reading with Deborah Willis & Michael Christie

Deborah WillisMichael Christie

Thursday, 15 September at 7.30pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

Deborah Willis was born and raised in Calgary, AB. Her fiction has appeared in Grain, Event, Prism International, and The Walrus. Her first book, Vanishing and Other Stories, was named one of the Globe and Mail’s Best Books of 2009, and was nominated for the BC Book Prize and the Governor General’s Award. She has worked as a horseback riding instructor and a reporter, and currently works as a bookseller in Victoria, BC.

 

Michael Christie was born and raised in Thunder Bay, Ontario. He recently worked for six years in a homeless shelter on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, Canada’s poorest neighborhood, providing outreach to the severely mentally ill. His first book, The Beggar’s Garden, a collection of stories set in Vancouver, published by HarperCollins Canada, was released in early 2011. “Tenderness, whimsy, goofiness, brilliance — a polished gem of narrative.”- Globe and Mail. “The Beggar’s Garden is about as good as a first book can be.” – The Toronto Star. He holds an MFA from the University of British Columbia, and his fiction has been twice nominated for the Journey Prize, Canada’s top short story honour. He is also a former professional skateboarder, and is currently an editor for Color, a skateboard magazine based in Vancouver.

 

Shortlistees Reading with Suzanne Rivecca & Alexander MacLeod

Suzanne RiveccaAlexander MacLeod

Thursday, 15 September at 9pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

Suzanne Rivecca’s first book, Death is Not an Option was a finalist for The Story Prize, The PEN/Hemingway Award, and the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award. She is the recipient of the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters as well as writing fellowships from Radcliffe and Stanford University. She is currently living in Rome and San Francisco, CA.

Alexander MacLeod was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of short stories (Light Lifting--Biblioasis, 2010), was shortlisted for the Giller Prize, the Commonwealth Prize, two Atlantic Book Awards, and went on to become a national bestseller. Alexander holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill; he currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, in Canada.

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FRIDAY

 

Valerie Trueblood Interview by Nuala Ní Chonchúir

 

Nuala Ní Chonchúir at the Cork International Short Story FestivalValerie Trueblood

Friday, 16 September at 3pm. The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork. Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

Valerie Trueblood grew up in rural Virginia, USA, studied with John Hawkes and John Berryman, worked as a caseworker in Chicago and as a reference librarian at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. In 2006, Trueblood’s first novel, Seven Loves, came out from Little Brown and was a Barnes and Noble “Discover Great New Writers”. Her latest collection of stories, Marry or Burn, has been shortlisted for the 2011 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award. She lives in Seattle and the Methow Valley. “Trueblood has earned a place next to Alice Munro on my shelf of fiction” - Alicia Ostriker

Nuala Ní Chonchúir lives in County Galway. Her début novel You was published by New Island in 2010; it was called ‘a heart-warmer’ by The Irish Times; The Irish Examiner said it was ‘a gem’; The Irish Independent, ‘a must read’. Her third short fiction collection Nude was published in 2009; The Irish Times called it ‘a memorable achievement’. Nude was shortlisted for the 2010 Edge Hill Short Story Prize. Nuala's third poetry collection The Juno Charm is forthcoming from Salmon Poetry in 2011. She is working on another novel.

 

Ethel Rohan and Alison MacLeod Reading

Ethel RohanAlison MacLeod

Friday, 16 September at 4pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

Ethel Rohan is the author of Hard to Say (PANK, 2011) and Cut Through the Bone, (Dark Sky Books, 2010), the latter named a 2010 Notable Story Collection by The Story Prize. Her work has or will appear in The Good Men Project, The Chattahoochee Review, Los Angeles Review, Potomac Review and Southeast Review Online, among many others. She earned her MFA in fiction from Mills College, California. Raised in Dublin, Ireland, Ethel Rohan now lives in San Francisco, California. Visit her at ethelrohan.com.

Alison MacLeod’s story collection Fifteen Modern Tales of Attraction (Penguin) was awarded the 2008 Olive Cook Prize for Short Fiction and named as one of the ‘Top Ten Books to Talk About in 2009’ as part of World Book Day events. She is the author of two novels, The Changeling (Macmillan) and The Wave Theory of Angels (Penguin), and is currently completing her second story collection and next novel. Alongside her writing, she is Professor of Contemporary Fiction at the University of Chichester.

 

 

RTÉ Francis MacManus Award reading

Friday, 16 September at 5pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

David Coakly performing at the Cork International Short Story FestivalDiarmuid Murtagh performing at the Cork International Short Story FestivalSusan Zelouf

 

 

The RTE Radio 1 Short Story Competition was founded in memory of Francis MacManus, the Kilkenny born novelist, biographer and former Head of Talks and Features at Radio Éireann. Over the past 25 years the competition has proved to be a launching pad for several new and emerging Irish writers and continues to offer a platform for the best of contemporary fiction. In 2011 First Prize was won by Washington DC-based Austin Duffy. His story “Orca” will be read by the actor Diarmuid Murtagh who graced our screens earlier this year on the TV blockbuster Camelot. Second Prize was won by Patrick Griffin from Kilkenny City for his story “Platform 17 – Grand Central Station”. Patrick’s story will be read by the actor and cabaret artiste Susan Zelouf. Third Prize was won by Andrew Fox from Skerries, Co. Dublin for his story “Seven Steps Home”. Andrew’s story will be read by Cork actor David Coakley who graced our screens earlier this year on the TV blockbuster Camelot.

 

 

Reading with Siobhan Fallon & Michal Ajvaz

 

Siobhan FallonMichal Ajvaz

Friday, 16 September at 7.30 pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

Siobhan Fallon lived at Fort Hood while her husband was deployed to Iraq for two tours of duty. She earned her MFA at the New School in New York City and now lives with her family near the American Embassy in Amman, Jordan. You Know When the Men Are Gone is her first book. “Siobhan Fallon tells gripping, straight-up, no-nonsense stories about American soldiers and their families. It’s clear from her tender yet tough-minded first book, You Know When the Men Are Gone, that she knows this world very well. The reader need not look at Ms. Fallon’s biography to guess that she, like her book’s characters, has spent time living in Fort Hood, Tex., watching the effects of soldiers’ leave-takings and homecomings on men and the wives they leave behind. Married to a man who is on at least his third tour of duty, Ms. Fallon now lives where he is stationed, in the Middle East.” - The New York Times

Michal Ajvaz, poet, fiction writer, and essayist, was born in Prague in1949. Between ‘67–’74 he read Czech and aesthetics at Prague University. He did various menial jobs including work as a janitor, a night-watchman in a garage and a pump attendant for the Prague Waterworks. Since 1994 he has worked as a full-time writer. He lives in Prague. His novel Empty Streets was awarded the Jaroslav Seifert Prize in 2005, the most prestigious literary award in the Czech Republic. Two other novels The Other City (1993) and The Golden Age (2001) are available in English translation from Dalkey Archive Press. The English translation of The Golden Age was listed as Amazon’s No 1 Science Fiction novel for 2010.

 

 

Shortlistees Reading with Yiyun Li & Valerie Trueblood

 

Yiyun LiValerie Trueblood

Friday, 16 September at 9pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel,
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

Yiyun Li is the author of A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, The Vagrants and Gold Boy, Emerald Girl. A native of Beijing and a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she was the recipient of the inaugural Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award, the Whiting Writers’ Award, and the Guardian First Book Award. She teaches writing at the University of California, Davis, and lives in Oakland, California, with her husband and their two sons.

Valerie Trueblood grew up in rural Virginia, USA, studied with John Hawkes and John Berryman, worked as a caseworker in Chicago and as a reference librarian at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. In 2006, Trueblood’s first novel, Seven Loves, came out from Little Brown and was a Barnes and Noble “Discover Great New Writers”. She lives in Seattle and the Methow Valley. “Trueblood has earned a place next to Alice Munro on my shelf of fiction” - Alicia Ostriker

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SATURDAY

 

Prizewinners' Reading

Hennessy winner Eileen Casey to read at Cork International short story festival

Saturday, 17 September at 12 noon
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

 

The winner of this year’s O’Faolain Prize is unknown until the festival begins but the winner of the Hennessy Emerging Fiction Award is Eileen Casey. Her fiction has also received The Maria Edgeworth Award, Listowel Writers’ Week Short Fiction Prize and The Cecil Day Lewis Award. To date, her stories have been published in the Moth, Verbal Arts Magazine and the Sunday Tribune, among others.

 

Anthologies Discussion

Saturday, 17 September at 2.30 PM. The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork.
Free event, all welcome. No booking required.

A panel discussion on the state of the short story and the publication of anthologies to promote the form.

 

Stinging Fly Showcase Reading with Mary Costello & Kathleen Murray

 

Mary CostelloKathleen Murray

Saturday, 17 September at 4pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

Mary Costello, originally from Galway, lives in Dublin. Her stories have been anthologised and published in New Irish Writing and in The Stinging Fly, most recently in the Spring 2011 edition. She was shortlisted for a Hennessy Award, and in spring 2010 was a finalist in the Narrative Short Story Competition in the U.S. She received an Arts Council bursary in 2011. A collection of her stories will be published by The Stinging Fly Press in early 2012.

Kathleen Murray lives in Dublin. A number of her short stories have appeared in The Stinging Fly, most recently in the Summer 2011 edition, and in anthologies of Irish writing. She was the winner of the Fish International Short Story Prize in 2007 and was shortlisted for the Davy Byrnes Award in 2009. She received an Arts Council bursary in 2010.

 

 

Reading with Glenn Patterson & Eoin McNamee

 

Glenn PattersonEoin McNamee

Saturday, 17 September at 7.30pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

Glenn Patterson was born, and lives, in Belfast. He is the author of seven novels: Burning Your Own (1988), Fat Lad (1992), Black Night at Big Thunder Mountain (1995), The International (1999), Number 5 (2003), That Which Was (2004), and The Third Party (2007). His non-fiction works are Lapsed Protestant (2006), and Once Upon a Hill: Love in Troubled Times (2009). A new novel The Mill for Grinding Old People Young will be published by Faber next year.

Eoin McNamee was born in Kilkeel, Co Down in 1961. His novels include Resurrection Man, The Blue Tango and 12 23. His latest novel is Orchid Blue, based on the execution of Robert McGladdery for the murder of Pearl Gamble.
“It is this sense of how the defining moments come to be agreed – of how they are essentially defined by the ruling class – that illuminates Orchid Blue, so that what begins as a crime thriller gradually builds not only into a political novel of the highest order but also that rare phenomenon, a genuinely tragic work of art.”
-John Burnside The Guardian

 

 

Shortlistee Reading with Edna O'Brien & Colm Tóibín

 

Edna O'BrienColm Tóibín

Saturday, 17 September at 9pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

 

 

 

Since her debut novel The Country Girls Edna O’Brien has written over twenty works of fiction along with a biography of James Joyce and Lord Byron. She is the recipient of many awards including the Irish PEN Lifetime Achievement Award, the American National Art’s Gold Medal and the Ulysses Medal. Born and raised in Co. Clare she has lived in London for many years.

Colm Toibin was born in Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford in 1955. He studied at University College Dublin and lived in Barcelona between 1975 and 1978. Out of his experience in Barcelona he produced two books, the novel The South (shortlisted for the Whitbread First Novel Award and winner of the Irish Times/ Aer Lingus First Fiction Award) and Homage to Barcelona, both published in 1990. He is a regular contributor to the Dublin Review, the New York Review of Books and the London Review of Books. In 2006 he was appointed to the Arts Council in Ireland. He is currently Leonard Milberg Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton University. Among his other novels are The Master and The Heather Blazing. He has published two short story collections, Mothers and Sons (2006, winner of the Edge Hill Prize) and The Empty Family (2010).

 

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SUNDAY

 

Frank O'Connor Literary Walking Tour
Frank O'Connor

 

Sunday, 18 September, 12 noon
Meet at The Munster Literature Centre, 84 Douglas St.
Free event, all welcome. No booking required.

 

 

Frank O'Connor biographer Jim McKeown will conduct the tour, which meets outside the Munster Literature Centre, 84 Douglas Street, Cork. The building that now houses the Munster Literature Centre offices was O'Connor's birthplace.

 

 

Awards Presentations: Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award & Seán Ó Faoláín Prize

 

Edna O'BrienAlexander MacLeodSuzanne RiveccaColm ToibinValerie TruebloodYiyun Li

Sunday, 18 September at 7pm
The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, Cork
Free event, all welcome. No booking necessary.

ABOUT THE AWARD


The 2011 Frank O’Connor International Short Story Prize is worth €35,000 to the winning author of a collection of short stories published for the first time, in English, anywhere in the world. This prestigious international short story award in the memory of Frank O’Connor is the single biggest prize in the world for a collection of short stories.
In honouring Cork’s literary genius and its most famous short story writer, it is hoped this award will achieve international recognition for the short story and highlight Cork’s important contribution to this literary art form.
This major international prize celebrating the city’s intimate relationship with the short story was established as part of the literary programme of Cork’s tenure as European Capital of Culture. Since then it has made possible through the generous support of Cork City Council.

In 2002, the Munster Literature Centre introduced the Seán Ó Faoláin Short Story Prize, an annual short story competition dedicated to one of Ireland's most accomplished story writers and theorists. This too is presented during the FOC festival. This year's judge is poet, novelist & playwright Ian Wild.

 

 

 

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Cork International Short Story Festival 2010

 

Ron Rash

Photo © John Minihan

 

Programme of Events 2010

2010 was the final year the autumn festival operated under the name 'The Frank O'Connor International Short Story Festival'. (Click here to read why the name changed.) Most readings took place at the Metropole Hotel. Other events included readings by emerging writers at the Boqueria, a David Marcus memorial at the Cork Synagogue in South Terrace, and a flash fiction reading at the city library in honour of the National Day of Action for the Arts. Readers at the Metropole featured work by literary greats from Ireland and abroad, including Claire Keegan, Karen Russell, Tess Gallagher, Louis de Bernieres, and the writers shortlisted for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award. Seminars included the topics 'Short Story & New Media' as well as 'Radio & the Short Story'.

One-day Workshops were held at the Munster Literature Centre itself, including a 'narrative poetry' workshop with Tess Gallagher, and a short story masterclass with Mary Morrissy.

The Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award was presented to Ron Rash and the Seán Ó Faoláin Prize went to Nikita Nelin.

 

Go to events on: Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday * Sunday

 

Wednesday 15th September

 

Opening wine reception and launch of Foster by Claire Keegan
Claire Keegan has been often compared to both John McGahern and William Trevor. Join us for the launch of her new book Foster. Claire will read and wine & canapés will be served.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 7pm. Admission: Free.

Aidan Mathews - A Reading
Aidan Mathews works full time as a radio producer for RTÉ but has been winning prizes for his poetry books since his early 20s. During the 90s he published a novel and two quirky collections which extended the boundaries of the Irish short story.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 9pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.

 

Thursday 16th September

 

Robin Black, Belle Boggs & Tania Hershman - A Reading
Tania Hershman is a young British-Israeli author and noted agitator on behalf of the short story; Robin Black and Belle Boggs are O’Connor Award shortlistees for their debut collections.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 7.30pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.

T. Coraghessan Boyle & Owen Hill - A Reading
Two writers from California: TC Boyle is an O’Connor Award shortlistee and the author of over twenty books of fiction, several of which have been adapted for Hollywood productions. Owen Hill is a poet and crime novelist and a key figure in the literary community of Berkeley.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 9.30pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.

* T. Coraghessan Boyle could not attend the festival in 2010 as originally scheduled. One of the authors was moved from the 7.30pm (Thursday) reading in his place.

Festival Club at the Boqueria
15 minute “Prebooked” reading by Sheila Mannix at festival club.
Venue: Boqueria, Bridge Street. Time: Approx. 11pm. Admission: Free.

 

Friday 17th September

 

National Day of Action for the Arts - Flash Fiction Reading
Join us for a reading of very short narrative texts by a variety of writers and readers
Venue: Central Library steps, Grand Parade Time: 11.30am. Admission: Free.

The Short Story & New Media - A Seminar
Chaired by festival director Patrick Cotter. Is the printed book endangered? Is web publication valid? In the future will key texts be published only on Kindle? How do podcasts help in promoting the short story? Listen to a selection of festival participants discuss these crucial questions and take the opportunity to ask questions from the floor.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 2pm. Admission: Free.

An Interview with Ben Greenman & Karen Russell by Sean Kim
Two young New York-based writers, one a New Yorker editor, another named by the New Yorker as one of America’s twenty best writers under forty years of age. Hear them discuss their own work, the writing game and the centrality of New York to the publishing industry.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 4pm. Admission: Free.

Ron Rash & David Constantine - A Reading
O’Connor Award shortlistees. American Ron Rash has published three collections of short stories and four novels, with his latest novel, Serena, he has gained international attention. Englishman David Constantine is arguably better known as a poet, but he has published three much admired short story collections.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 7.30pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.

Ben Greenman & Karen Russell - A Reading
Two young American writers known for their humour, occasional irreverence and wild imaginations.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 9.30pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.

Festival Club at the Boqueria
15 minute “Prebooked” reading by Sean Kim at festival club.
Venue: Boqueria, Bridge Street. Time: Approx. 11pm. Admission: Free

 

Saturday 18th September

 

Narrative Poetry - A Workshop with Tess Gallagher
Venue: Munster Literature Centre, Douglas Street. Time: 9.30am -11.30am. Phone 021-431 2955 to book.

Short Story Writing - A Workshop with Mary Morrissy
Venue: Munster Literature Centre, Douglas Street. Time: 9.30am -11.30am. Phone 021-431 2955 to book.

Joyce Russell, Madeleine D’Arcy & YTA Seán Ó Faoláin Winner - A Reading
Readings by award winners: Russell (Francis MacManus Winner) & D’Arcy (Hennessy Award Winner), plus the prize-winning story from this year’s Seán Ó Faoláin Competition.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 12 noon. Admission: Free.

Seminar on Radio & the Short Story
Chaired by poet Billy Ramsell, a discussion about the centrality of radio to the short story. Three producers (Seamus Hosey, Di Speirs & Aidan Stanley) working for RTÉ and the BBC talk about what they look for in a story and what adjustments they need to make for different types of production. Questions from the audience will be encouraged.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 2pm. Admission: Free.

Interview with Tess Gallagher by Beverly Parayno
Poet and short story writer Tess Gallagher talks about her own work, how it influenced and was influenced by the work of her late husband Raymond Carver.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 4pm. Admission: Free.

Laura van den Berg & David Vann - A Reading
Laura Van Den Berg has been shortlisted for the O’Connor Award for her debut collection. David Vann’s debut collection Legend of a Suicide has itself already become legendary.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 7pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.


Tess Gallagher & Ita Daly - A Reading

Tess Gallagher is renowned as a poet but has published several collections of stories too, relating to both Irish and American lives. Ita Daly is a member of Aosdana and is one of Ireland’s most respected novelists.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 8.30pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.

Louis de Bernières & Nyk de Vries - A Reading
Louis de Bernières achieved world fame for novels such as Birds Without Wings and Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. Nyk de Vries is a young Friesian novelist and musician who will be reading from his collection of short short narratives.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 10pm. Admission: Free, donation of €5 encouraged.

Festival Club at the Boqueria
15 minute “Prebooked” reading by Beverly Parayno at festival club.
Venue: Boqueria, Bridge Street. Time: Approx. 11.15pm. Admission: Free.

 

Sunday 19th September

 

Frank O’Connor Literary Walking Tour
Literary walking tour with Jim McKeown, biographer of Frank O’Connor. Starting at the Gables Bar and MLC, Douglas Street, finishing at MacCurtain Street
Venue: Tour starts at the Munster Literature Centre, 84 Douglas Street, Cork. Time: 10am - 12 noon. Admission: Free.

David Marcus Memorial Reading
Cork-born author David Marcus has been described for very good reasons as the Godfather of the contemporary Irish short story. We mark the first year of his passing with a reading of his story “Who’s Ever Heard of an Irish Jew” by actor Jack Healy. Ticket only.
Venue: Cork Synagogue, South Terrace. Time: 4pm. Admission: Ticketed.

Presentation of the 2010 Seán Ó Faoláin Prize & Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award
Culmination of festival with wine reception and announcement of the winners.
Venue: The Ballroom, Metropole Hotel, MacCurtain Street. Time: 8pm. Admission: Free.

 

 

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Frank O'Connor Festival 2009

Simon Van Booy

Photo © John Minihan

 

Programme of Events 2009

Events in the 2009 festival took place at Cork Central Library and in the Stack Theatre at the Cork School of Music. Events included public interviews, musical performances, discussions ('The State of the Art') and readings. Literary greats from Ireland and abroad reading at the festival included Mary Morrissy, ZZ Packer, Jon Boilard as well as the writers shortlisted for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.

One-day Workshops were held at the Munster Literature Centre itself, including a beginners' workshop with Jon Boilard, and a short story masterclass with Mary Morrissy.

The Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award was presented to Simon Van Booy. Seán Ó Faoláin Prize winner Alexa Beattie could not attend the festival, but was named at the prize-giving ceremony.

 

Go to events on: Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday * Sunday

Wednesday, 16th September

Philip Ó Ceallaigh Public Interview by Billy Ramsell
Prize-winning Irish author interviewed by young poet.
Venue: Cork City Library, Grand Parade. Time: 4pm. Admission: Free.

Philip Ó Ceallaigh and MJ Farrell - Reading
Cork City - Frank O’Connor Award twice nominated author reads with Irish debut author.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 8pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5.

Festival Club: Musician- Hank Wedel. Venue: The Long Valley (Hayloft), Winthrop St. Time: 10.00 - Late.

 

Thursday, 17th September

Petina Gappah Public Interview by Ann Luttrell
Cork City - Frank O’Connor Award nominated author from Zimbabwe talks to Literature Officer of the Triskel Arts Centre.
Venue: Cork City Library, Grand Parade. Time: 4pm. Admission: Free.

Shih Li Kow & Jack Harte - A Reading
A reading by Cork City - Frank O’Connor Award nominated author from Malaysia with the Chairman of the Irish Writers’ Centre.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 7pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5

Petina Gappah & Liesl Jobson - A Reading
Cork City - Frank O’Connor Award nominated author from Zimbabwe and a flash fiction specialist from South Africa.
A reading by Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 9pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5

Festival Club: Author - Madeleine Darcy with musicians Marja Gaynor and Eileen Healy. Venue: The Long Valley (Hayloft), Winthrop St. Time: 10.30 - Late.

Friday, 18th September

Nude by Nuala Ní Chonchúir- Book Launch
former Southword fiction editor and prize-winning author Nuala Ní Chonchúir celebrates the publication of Nude - her third collection of short stories.
Venue: Cork City Library, Grand Parade. Time: 4pm. Refreshments Admission: Free.

Simon Van Booy & Billy O’Callaghan - A Reading
Cork City - Frank O’Connor Award nominated British author from New York reads with Cork author who has just published his second collection of stories from Cork-based press Mercier.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 7pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5

Mary Morrissey & Charlotte Grimshaw - A Reading
Cork City - Frank O’Connor Award twice nominated author from New Zealand reads with established Irish author.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 9pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5

Festival Club: Author Kevin Doyle and musician Fintan Lucy. Venue: The Long Valley (Hayloft), Winthrop St. Time: 10.30 - Late.

Saturday, 19th September

Short Story Beginnings - A Workshop with Jon Boilard
An introduction to writing Short Stories given by Jon Boilard, former fiction editor of Southword and winner of the Sean O’Faolain Short Story Prize.
Venue: Munster Literature Centre, Douglas Street. Time: 11am -1pm. Fee: €40. Participation limited to eight individuals. Phone 021-4312955 to book.

Short Story Masterclass - A Workshop with Mary Morrissey
An advanced workshop exclusively for authors who have already published one or more short stories.
Venue: Munster Literature Centre, Douglas Street. Time: 11am -1pm. Fee: €40. Participation limited to five individuals. Phone 021-4312955 to book.

Who has won the Sean Ó Faoláin Prize?
The announcement and reading of the winning short story of the €1500 2009 Sean Ó Faoláin Short Story Prize.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 2pm. Admission: free.

The State of the Art - A Discussion
An open conversation involving a selection of festival participants.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 4pm. Admission: Free.

Wells Tower & Sude - A Reading
Cork City - Frank O’Connor Award nominated author from the United States reads with Shanghai author who is on a residency with the Munster Literature Centre.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 7pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5

Alan Titley & ZZ Packer - A Reading
Readings by two established and respected authors each known for the their laugh-out loud humour. One from Ireland and one from the United States.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 9pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5

Festival Club: Author Jon Boilard and musician Perry Wild.
Venue: The Long Valley (Hayloft), Winthrop St. Time: 10.30 - Late.

Sunday, 20th September

Announcement of the Winner of the 2009 Cork City - Frank O’Connor Short Story Award
This is where we reveal which of our six shortlistees has been judged author of the best short story collection of the year in English with a purse of €35,000.
Venue: Stack Theatre - Cork School of Music, Union Quay. Time: 4.30 pm. Admission: Free. Refreshments will be served.

 

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Frank O'Connor Festival 2008

 

Jhumpa Lahiri and Julia Van Middlesworth

Photo © John Minihan

 

Programme of Events 2008

Events in the 2008 festival took place at the Triskel Arts Centre and included public interviews, discussions and readings. Literary greats from Ireland and abroad reading at the festival included Yiyun Li, who was sadly unable to travel to Ireland after winning the inaugural Frank O'Connor Award in 2005. Other readers included Clare Wigfall, William Wall, Adam Marek, Alison MacLeod, Bernard McLaverty & Julie Orringer. Discussions included topics such as 'What Does an Editor Want?'

One-day Workshops were held at the Munster Literature Centre itself, including a flash fiction workshop with Nuala Ní Chonchúir, and a workshop on the art of reading stories to an audience with Simon Robson.

Seán Ó Faoláin Prize winner Julia Van Middlesworth read her winning story 'Daddy Dead', and the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award was presented to Jhumpa Lahiri. The judging panel in 2008 put forward no short list.

 

Go to events on: Wednesday * Thursday * Friday * Saturday * Sunday

Wednesday 17th September

Opening Reception and launch of Stingingfly Press Anthology. Refreshments and readings. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 7pm. Admission: Free.

Yiyun Li- Reading and Interview. Venue:Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 9pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5.

Thursday 18th September

What does an editor want? - Reading and Discussion Jon Boilard, Vincent McDonnell & Nuala Ní Chonchúir, three fiction editors of Southword and former judges of the Sean O’Faolain Short Story Competition, will each read a story of their own and then conduct a discussion. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 2.30pm. Admission: Free

Ian Wild & Clare Wigfall - A Reading. A reading by two young exiled British short story writers, County Cork-based Ian Wild and Berlin-based Clare Wigfall, who has just won the BBC National Short Story Prize. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 7pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5.

William Wall & Adam Marek - A Reading. A reading by distinguished Cork-based novelist and man of letters William Wall, joined on this occasion by young British short story writer Adam Marek. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 9pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5.

Friday 19th September

Flash Fiction Workshop. Southword fiction editor Nuala Ní Chonchúir presents a how-to session on Flash Fiction. Venue: Munster Literature Centre, Douglas Street. Time: 10am - 12pm. Fee: €40. Participation limited to eight individuals. Phone 021-4312955 to book.

Southword Showcase - A Reading Southword is establishing itself as a journal which publishes excellent short fiction by both unknown writers and international stars such as Colm Toibín, Haruki Murakami and James Lasdun. Julian Campredon, Tania Hershman and Denise O’Keefe. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 2.30pm. Admission: Free.

Rachel Trezise & Mary O’Donnell - A Reading. Young Welsh iconoclast Rachel Trezise reads with Co. Kildare-based poet, novelist and broadcaster Mary O’Donnell. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 7pm. Admission: Free for Culture Night!

Mary Leland & Wena Poon - A Reading. Cork-based novelist Mary Leland shares the stage with San Francisco-based Wena Poon. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 9pm. Admission: Free for Culture Night!

Saturday 20th September

Starting Short Stories - A Workshop. An introduction to writing short stories by Jon Boilard, former fiction editor of Southword and former winner of the Sean O’Faolain Short Story Prize. Venue: Munster Literature Centre, Douglas Street. Time: 10am -12pm. Fee: €40. Participation limited to eight individuals. Phone 021-4312955 to book.

Don’t Drone On - a Workshop on Reading the Short Story Aloud. Simon Robson gives you pointers on how to improve your performance and develop a reputation where festival and reading curators can’t resist including you on their programmes. Venue: Munster Literature Centre, Douglas Street. Time: 10am -12pm. Fee: €40. Participation limited to eight individuals. Phone 021-4312955 to book.

Who has won the Sean O’Faolain Prize? The announcement and reading of the winning short story of the 2008 Sean O’Faolain Short Story Prize. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre ,Tobin Street. Time: 12.30pm. Admission: Free.

The State of the Art - a Discussion. Chaired by Rosalind Porter, Senior Editor at Granta, and including Declan Meade, Stinging Fly editor; Jen Hamilton-Emery, commissioning editor at Salt Publishing; and Lucy Luck, literary agent. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 2.30pm. Admission: Free.

Salt no Vinegar Please: Carys Davies & Vanessa Gebbie - A Reading. Readings by two of the eight Salt authors longlisted for the Frank O’Connor Award this year. Salt is now the world’s most prolific publisher of short story collections and we are delighted to be able to showcase both the publisher and their authors Carys Davies and Vanessa Gebbie. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 4.30pm. Admission: Free.

Alison McLeod and Simon Robson - A Reading. British-based Canadian novelist Alison McLeod and actor, playwright and fiction writer Simon Robson read from their very different flavoured works. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 7pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5.

Julie Orringer and Bernard MacLaverty - A Reading. Erstwhile San Francisco resident Julie Orringer reads from her admired debut collection. She is followed by one of the Irish giants of the short story form, Bernard MacLaverty. Venue: Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street. Time: 9pm. Admission: Suggested donation €5.

Sunday 21st September

Presentation of the 2008 Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Jhumpa Lahiri, the recipient of the 2008 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, will read from her winning book and conduct a public interview with Irish Times Literary Critic Eileen Battersby. Venue: Millennium Hall, Cork City Hall. Time: 7.30pm. Admission: Free. Refreshments will be served.