Friday, September 14th

Notes on booking tickets:
Early bird bookings can be made by credit card through the website until Sunday 9th September.
Thereafter, all purchases for the Firkin Crane events must be purchased directly from the Firkin Crane (phone +21 450 7487).
Tickets for the Nano Nagle Place events will be available at the door on the night.
All library events are free. All other events are priced €5 per ticket inclusive of booking fees

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Banshee Showcase
with Emma Flynn, Diarmuid Hickey, Mary McGill and Tom Vowler

2.30pm, Grand Parade Library
Free event

Banshee is a print journal of exciting, accessible, contemporary writing from Ireland and around the world. Banshee is published twice a year—in spring and autumn—and features short stories, flash fiction, poetry, personal essays and interviews. Their first issue launched in September 2015 and their most recent is #7 autumn/winter 2018. Banshee is edited by three writers in their early 30s: Laura Cassidy, Claire Hennessy and Eimear Ryan.

Emma Flynn is an emerging writer from Kerry living in Berlin. Her work has appeared in The Cardiff Review, Vox, Bustle and Totally Dublin She is currently writing her debut novel.

 

Diarmuid Hickey is from Tipperary. He recently completed an MA in Creative Writing in UCC.

 

 

Mary McGill a researcher and writer. Her fiction has been shortlisted for the Irish Times Short Story Prize, the Francis MacManus Award and the RTE/Penguin Short Story Competition. She was a featured reader at the Cuirt Festival’s New Writing Showcase in 2015. She tweets at @missmarymcgill.

 

Tom Vowler lives in south west England. His debut story collection, The Method, won the Scott Prize and the Edge Hill Readers’ Prize, while his novels What Lies Within and That Dark Remembered Day received critical acclaim. He is short fiction editor at Unthank Books. Tom’s second collection of stories, Dazzling the Gods, was published in January 2018.

 

Seán O'Faoláin Prize Reading

4pm, Grand Parade Library
Free event

The Seán O'Faoláin Prize is awarded to the best single story entered in competition from anywhere in the world. The first prize is €2000. The winner also receives a week's residency at the Anam Cara artist retreat in West Cork and publication of their winning story in Southword. The winner, if they choose to travel to Cork for this event, also receives accomodation with meals for the duration of the festival, a masterclass scholarship and entry into all events. This occasion is an opportunity to hear the winning story and the judge's citation from Paul McVeigh.

The Good SonPaul McVeigh’s debut novel, won The Polari Prize and The McCrea Literary Award. It was shortlisted for The Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award, the Prix du Roman Cezam in France and a finalist for The People’s Book Prize. The Good Sonwas chosen as Brighton’s City Reads 2016 and was given out as part of World Book Night 2017. Paul has written comedy, essays, flash fiction, a novel, plays and short stories, and his work has been performed on stage and radio, and published in seven languages.

Mia Gallagher in conversation with Danielle McLaughlin

7pm, Firkin Crane Theatre (€5)

Mia Gallagher was born in Dublin, where she lives and works. Her debut novel, HellFire, was widely acclaimed and received the Irish Tatler Women of the Year Literature Award in 2007, while her award-winning short fiction has been widely published and anthologised. Mia has received several Literature Bursaries from the Arts Council of Ireland and has been writer-in-residence in many different environments, both at home and abroad. In a parallel universe, Mia works as a professional actor, performing in theatre, radio and occasionally film. Beautiful Pictures of the Lost Homeland is her second novel.

Danielle McLaughlin’s stories have appeared in various journals, newspapers and anthologies, including The New Yorker, The Irish Times, Southword, The Penny Dreadful, Long Story Short and The Stinging Fly. They have also appeared in various anthologies, such as the Bristol Prize Anthology, the Fish Anthology and the 2014 Davy Byrnes Anthology, and have been broadcast on RTE Radio 1 and BBC Radio 4. Her debut collection of short stories, Dinosaurs On Other Planets, was published in Ireland in 2015 by The Stinging Fly Press and in the UK and US in 2016 by John Murray and Random House.

Ben Marcus in conversation with Danny Denton

8.30pm, Firkin Crane Theatre (€5)

Ben Marcus the author of three books of fiction: Notable American Women, The Father Costume, and The Age of Wire and String. His new novel, The Flame Alphabet, will be published by Knopf in January 2012. Marcus has published stories, essays, and reviews in numerous publications, including Harper's, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, The Believer, The New York Times, Salon, McSweeney's, Time, Conjunctions, Grand Street, and Tin House. He is the editor of The Anchor Book of New American Short Stories, and for several years he was the fiction editor of Fence. He is a 2009 recipient of a grant for Innovative Literature from the Creative Capital Foundation. In 2008 he received the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and he has also received a Whiting Writers Award, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in fiction, three Pushcart Prizes, and a fiction fellowship from the Howard Foundation of Brown University. Since 2000 he has been on the faculty at Columbia University's School of the Arts, where he is an associate professor.

Danny Denton is a writer from Cork, Ireland. He has been awarded several bursaries and scholarships for his work, and has published work in various journals. The Earlie King and the Kid in Yellowis his first novel. Billed as a ‘gangster ballad love story’, it depicts an Ireland plagued by relentless rain, deadly fires, roaming gangs and warring factions. When the Kid in Yellow meets the daughter of the menacing Earlie King the stage is set for tragedy.

Chris Power in conversation with Paul McVeigh

10pm, Firkin Crane Theatre (€5)

Chris Power lives and works in London. His 'Brief Survey of the Short Story' has appeared in the Guardian since 2007. His fiction has been published in The Stinging FlyThe Dublin Review and The White ReviewMothers is his first book.

The Good SonPaul McVeigh’s debut novel, won The Polari Prize and The McCrea Literary Award. It was shortlisted for The Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award, the Prix du Roman Cezam in France and a finalist for The People’s Book Prize. The Good Sonwas chosen as Brighton’s City Reads 2016 and was given out as part of World Book Night 2017. Paul has written comedy, essays, flash fiction, a novel, plays and short stories, and his work has been performed on stage and radio, and published in seven languages.